Hospital auxiliary group donates $43,000 for equipment | UToledo News

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Hospital auxiliary group donates $43,000 for equipment

The University of Toledo Medical Center Satellites auxiliary, at a Jan. 6 luncheon, awarded $43,350 to eight UTMC patient-care programs and departments to purchase equipment.

Representatives from five UT Medical Center departments were all smiles after they received funds to purchase equipment for their departments. They are, from left, Jerry Allen of the Kobacker Center, Michelle Giovanoli and Dianne Adams of the Department of Radiation Oncology, Dr. Dalynn Badenhop of the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program, Jeffrey McAnall of Rehabilitation Services, and Ann Locher of the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program. Joining them was Mark Chastang, second from right, vice president and UTMC executive director.

Representatives from five UT Medical Center departments were all smiles after they received funds to purchase equipment for their departments. They are, from left, Jerry Allen of the Kobacker Center, Michelle Giovanoli and Dianne Adams of the Department of Radiation Oncology, Dr. Dalynn Badenhop of the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program, Jeffrey McAnall of Rehabilitation Services, and Ann Locher of the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program. Joining them was Mark Chastang, second from right, vice president and UTMC executive director.

The auxiliary raises money to support the hospital through events such as book fairs, jewelry and poinsettia sales, and through the operation of the gift shop in the hospital, according to Lynn Brand, Satellites president.

Last fall, the Satellites awarded more than $40,000 in scholarships to UT students.

Mark Chastang, vice president and UT Medical Center executive director, recognized and thanked the organization, noting that the group’s service and commitment embodies the hospital’s mission of providing safe, compassionate, high-quality, patient-centered care.

The funds will be used to purchase:

• An ice/water machine for the Department of Radiation Oncology to help cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy who often experience dry mouth and mouth sores. The department also was awarded funds to buy furniture and a television for a soon-to-be-established patient education room.

• A computerized exercise management system to monitor the oxygen levels, heart rate and blood pressure of patients enrolled in the hospital’s phase IIII cardiac rehabilitation program.

• A late-model sedan for the hospital’s driver rehabilitation program that offers behind-the-wheel driver assessments by occupational therapists for people with disabilities. UT Medical Center has the only hospital-based driver evaluation and rehabilitation program in northwest Ohio that is licensed by the Ohio Department of Public Safety.

• Stuffed animals that are given by the UT Police Department Cheer Program to calm pediatric patients in the Emergency Department.

• Nintendo Wii game systems to improve the motion, strength, motor control and balance of patients enrolled in inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation programs.

• Two-way radios for the Kobacker Center day treatment program to improve the safety of faculty, staff and patients. The center also received funds for a multimedia projector and screen for patients, staff and families, and Nintendo Wii games, relaxation CDs, therapeutic recreational materials and stereo equipment for patients.

• Flat-screen television panels in Orthopedic Center patient examination rooms that will be used to show instructional and educational videos.

• Printed materials distributed to hospitalized patients and their families by the Pastoral Care Department.

Also funded was a teen-support group of the Ryan White Program for HIV/AIDS patients. Adolescents who are infected or impacted by an HIV infection and their families get together for monthly meetings for social support and to develop life goals.

The Satellites auxiliary, which was founded in 1975 at the former Medical College of Ohio, works to promote and support education, research and patient care programs and to increase community awareness and interest in UT. Since 1975, the group has donated more than $2 million to the hospital, according to Brand.

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