UT College of Medicine awards more than $1.2 million in scholarships | UToledo News

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UT College of Medicine awards more than $1.2 million in scholarships

The College of Medicine and Life Sciences at The University of Toledo recently awarded more than $1.2 million in scholarships to its students.

Dr. Imran Ali, professor of neurology and senior associate dean for academic affairs, joined students Ariel Sims and Olatoye Olutola at the College of Medicine and Life Sciences Scholarship Dinner Oct. 2.

Dr. Imran Ali, professor of neurology and senior associate dean for academic affairs, joined students Ariel Sims and Olatoye Olutola at the College of Medicine and Life Sciences Scholarship Dinner Oct. 2.

In total, 104 students were recipients of 60 different scholarships, which totaled $1,215,467. At last year’s scholarship awards dinner, a little more than $1.1 million was awarded to around 100 students.

“This event is one of the highlights of the academic year for the college,” said Dr. Christopher Cooper, dean of the UT College of Medicine and Life Sciences. “The University of Toledo is fortunate to have an ever increasing pool of extremely well-qualified applicants for medical school, which topped over 4,000 applicants for 176 positions in this year’s entering class.”

Both Cooper and Joseph Zerbey, chair of the UT Board of Trustees, said they are continually impressed by the hard work and dedication of students at the University.

“I have served on the board for five years, and in that time I have been amazed at how much I didn’t know about this great University, even as a longtime Toledo resident,” Zerbey said. “By far, one of the best parts of being a trustee is learning about the ways faculty, staff, students and alumni are making this community and the world a better place to live.”

The scholarship awards dinner, while focused mainly on the students, also recognized the generous donors who make the scholarships possible each year.

“The nation, the state of Ohio, and our region of northwest Ohio are all facing significant physician shortages to meet the health-care needs of our communities,” Cooper said. “Rising medical school indebtedness is one of the biggest challenges to pursuing a medical education and a career as a physician, which is why we are so committed to helping to reduce that financial burden by growing our scholarship program.”

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