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UToledo Giving Away Free Pocket Constitutions to Honor Constitution Day

The University of Toledo normally celebrates Constitution Day with the swearing in of dozens of people as U.S. citizens at a naturalization ceremony on campus.

However, this year during the coronavirus pandemic the University is handing out free pocket constitutions at Carlson Library.

The pocket constitutions are available in both English and Spanish on the first floor at the circulation desk.

“The purpose of Constitution Day and Citizenship Day and Week is to observe and commemorate our freedoms and to remember our responsibilities as citizens,” Lucy Duhon, collection sharing coordinator and scholarly communications librarian, said. “This is a great opportunity to enhance the civic engagement of our students.”

Constitution Day recognizes the formation and signing of the U.S. Constitution on Sept. 17, 1787. All educational institutions that receive federal funds hold events to recognize the day.

Earlier this week the Federalist Society at the UToledo College of Law hosted a virtual event titled “Qualified Immunity and the Future of Civil Rights Legislation” as part of Constitution Week that featured Christopher Walker, the John W. Bricker Professor of Law at Ohio State University, and Rebecca Zietlow, the Charles W. Fornoff Professor of Law and Values at UToledo.

In addition to providing a background and information on the U.S. Constitution, University Libraries’ library guide also features Constitution Day games, puzzles and quizzes for people of all ages.

“We also want to remind the community that Carlson Library is a federal depository,” Duhon said. “That means we provide free access to core resources and documents from the federal government, including the U.S. budget, public papers of the president and the Congressional Record.”

University Libraries Prioritizes Subscriptions

In response to the coronavirus pandemic’s financial implications across campus, University Libraries has prioritized its subscriptions available to the UToledo community.

“The assessment of usage statistics plays a major role in our decision-making process,” said Sheryl R. Stevens, director of collection services with University Libraries. “In all probability, the most-used resources will receive top renewal priority.”

In addition, decisions are based on whether a resource is critical to research, teaching and learning at the University, Stevens added.

“Resources deemed core receive our top renewal priority,” she said.

So far for fiscal year 2021, 14 resources have not been renewed. As other subscriptions come up for renewal, that list may grow as the library addresses a budget reduction of nearly $487,000. After factoring in annual subscription inflation, the library is projecting total resource cuts of about $660,000.

“We will do our best to keep essential resources in all of the academic disciplines that need University Libraries’ support,” Stevens said. “Access to existing OhioLINK full-text journals and books seems assured at this point.”

And campus community members will have a new resource: Cambridge University Press E-Books, thanks to a five-year agreement through the OhioLINK library consortium.

“This new agreement opened up access to almost 9,000 scholarly e-books on more than 30 different subject areas at the Cambridge core platform,” Stevens said. “These books also can be discovered and accessed via our online catalog.”

All of the newly accessible titles have publication dates of 2015 to the present, and titles published by Cambridge through 2025 also will be accessible to OhioLINK libraries.

For the latest information on resource cancellations and additions, visit the University Libraries’ subscriptions guide.

UToledo Unites in Solidarity to Identify Solutions to Address Systemic Racial Injustice

The University of Toledo’s campus community united in solidarity and support Thursday evening for those affected by the killing of George Floyd.

The first Dialogues on Diversity Virtual Town Hall brought together University leadership, faculty, staff, students and the public to reflect on their experiences, identify solutions to address systemic racial injustice, and highlight campus and community resources to aid in coping with trauma.

“I am so pleased with the dynamic, meaningful ideas that resulted from our successful discussion,” Dr. Willie McKether, vice president for diversity and inclusion, said. “I appreciate the passion and motivation of our Rocket family and the support we have for each other. This is the beginning of a series of respectful, painful conversations in the coming weeks, including when the semester starts.”

More than 350 people attended the event that featured panelists:

• UToledo Police Chief Jeff Newton;

• Benjamin Davis, UToledo law professor;

• Dr. Monita Mungo, UToledo assistant professor of sociology;

• Dr. La Tasha Sullivan, director of the University Counseling Center;

• Nyah Kidd, president of the Black Student Union;

• Darren Gordon, former president of the UToledo chapter of the Student National Medical Association;

• Giselle Zelaya, president of the Latino Student Union;

• Nick Thompson, president of Student Government;

• Anjali Phadke, vice president of Student Government; and

• Asher Sovereign with the Sexuality and Gender Alliance.

Members of the campus community shared personal experiences and the great sadness and fear sparked by watching the video of George Floyd’s death.

“As a teen growing up in Mississippi, my parents would consistently remind my siblings and me when we would leave the house for fun or to hang out with our family and friends, ‘Remember we love you, but you must come home at night,’” Dr. Phillip “Flapp” Cockrell, vice president for student affairs and vice provost, said. “As I got older and started to experience racism, discrimination and prejudice firsthand, I began to understand the meaning of those powerful 11 words. In essence, my parents were saying, ‘Always obey the law and follow their instructions and rules. Do as you are told. Don’t argue.’ These past two weeks have been the most difficult weeks in my life. When will this behavior stop? Am I next? I’m at a loss for words.”

“As I reflect on the events of the last few weeks and our community discussion last evening, I am inspired by our students, faculty, staff and alumni for their commitment, perseverance and passion to change the world,” UToledo President Sharon L. Gaber said. “Yet I grieve the recent senseless deaths of George Floyd and Breona Taylor. As a human and a mother, I cannot fathom the pain and anguish that their families are experiencing. Racial injustice, police brutality and disparate treatment have painfully existed for longer than all of us have been alive. As a campus community, we have made great strides to create a more open and inclusive community, working together to develop and implement UToledo’s first diversity plan. And yet it isn’t nearly enough. Now is the time to end this in our community, our country and in the world. I challenge each and every one of you to ‘be the change you want to see in the world.’”

Panelists brought forward ideas and solutions to elevate our community, such as training students in nonviolence and conflict transformation to teach them how to respond to what they will face while protesting by utilizing faculty expertise in the Peace Education Program, which is part of the Judith Herb College of Education.

“I am proud of the strength and courage of our students as they engage in deep, thoughtful, critical discussions and examine the ways we can change our society for the better,” Dr. Karen Bjorkman, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, said. “It is our solemn responsibility and our honor to equip them with the knowledge and tools they need to lead that change into the future.”

Leaders from across the University have expressed their commitment to embracing the critical role higher education can and must play in facilitating open and honest discussions that empower us as a community and a nation to translate our ideals into actionable change.

• Dr. Heidi Appel, dean of the Jesup Scott Honors College: “We believe in the power of higher education to address major societal problems like this injustice. We hope that by challenging our students to think deeply about the world they live in and to take actions that support greater diversity, equity and inclusion, we are helping to build a better world.”

• Dr. Anne Balazs, dean of the College of Business and Innovation: “It is with great sadness that we bear witness to the events of the past week, with the untimely and violent death of George Floyd and the continuing expressions of hatred and prejudice. As members of a scholarly community, one which is dedicated to education and improving our shared quality of life, it is unacceptable to idly stand by and allow racism in all its many forms to persist.”

• Benjamin Barros, dean of the College of Law: “The past week’s events have shown the realities of the work we must do as a nation to ensure that our justice system protects and serves all people. Our mission at the law school is intrinsically tied to the mission of equal access to justice. We are uniquely positioned to empower future generations of lawyers to evaluate our country’s legal systems, engage in thoughtful discourse, and address inequality. The change we need to see as a nation begins with each of us doing our part to create a diverse, supportive and inclusive community.”

• Dr. Amanda Bryant-Friedrich, dean of the College of Graduate Studies: “Life is heavy for all of us today. It has been that way for some of us for many, many days. First, a global pandemic and now violence and division dominate our news cycle. I am sad, I am afraid, and I am hopeful. I am sorry for your loss, I am sorry for your fear, I am sorry for your anger, I am sorry for the lack of justice, I am sorry there is no cure, and I am sorry that I am sorry. You are valued, and we hear you. We are here for you today and every day.”

• Beau Case, dean of University Libraries: “The University Libraries believe that diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility are not merely ideals — they are core values which we display daily in our work. Our campus doors are open to all. Our services are free of bias. We offer safe spaces for exploration, discovery, lifelong learning and wonder.”

• Dr. Christopher Cooper, dean of the College of Medicine and Life Sciences: “From all appearances, he was neither protected with courage nor served with compassion. Now ‘I can’t breathe’ has become the rallying cry of protests locally and nationally, peaceful and violent. Lurking beneath this are the concerns and outrage of ongoing racism, systemic racism, institutional violence and failed inclusion. If we want to improve the world, we better start close to home with our region, our community and, most importantly, with ourselves.”

• Charlene Gilbert, dean of the College of Arts and Letters: “The peaceful protests occurring in many of our major cities and towns not only reflect the anger over the death of Mr. Floyd, but also represent years of frustration with the injustice and unequal treatment experienced by African Americans and people of color in communities all across this nation. The College of Arts and Letters is a community where we value and celebrate not only critical inquiry, but also thoughtful action. We want to thank every student, faculty member, staff person and alumnus who has participated in some form of action to add your voice to the many calling for justice.”

• Dr. John Laux, associate dean of student affairs in the College of Health and Human Services: “George Floyd’s murder at the hands of police officers is the latest example of violence perpetrated against African Americans. We honor George Floyd’s life, and those who were murdered or assaulted previously by focusing our attention on our society’s history of and ongoing racism and systemic social injustice by working collectively to be agents of change. The College of Health and Human Services trains students for careers in social service, health sciences and criminal justice, including police civil service. We recognize that we are a product of our society. The status quo is not acceptable. And, as such, we have work to do to root out and put an end to individual and institutional racism. We are committed to do the work necessary to be a part of the solution.”

• Dr. Linda Lewandowski, dean of the College of Nursing: “We know that long-term discrimination has negative effects on physical and mental health and that violence, discrimination and racism directly impact social determinants of health and result in health disparities and inequities. Given the disproportionate impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our African-American communities, the health impact of continued disparities is even more profound. As healthcare professionals, we are in a unique position to address the health and the social justice issues that are so pressing in our nation at this time. Change begins with each one of us and is reflected in how we treat each other on a daily basis.”

• Mike O’Brien, vice president and athletic director: “Last night’s dialogue was excellent as it was very informative and insightful. We must stand together and be committed for equity, diversity and the fight against racial injustice.”

• Dr. John Plenefisch, interim dean of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics: “The College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics must translate the powerful words and feelings expressed by those protesting systemic racism into sustained action that makes a concrete difference in our community, including through our work and actions here in our college. As scientists and mathematicians, we can take action against racism, bigotry and prejudice in many ways, including choosing to focus our research on issues that disproportionally impact marginalized communities or groups, and deliberately supporting the careers and training of people of color as future generations of scientists and mathematicians.”

• Dr. Gary Pollack, dean of the College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences: “Our obligation to our fellow human beings is not diminished by the color of their skin, or by how they express their spirituality, or by their country of origin, or by whom they happen to love. Those characteristics, which some voices emphasize in an attempt to divide us, are infinitesimal compared to the many things that make us what we are: the human family.”

• Dr. Mike Toole, dean of the College of Engineering: “I found each of the speakers and the entire event to be compelling and inspiring. It is critical that we have administrators, faculty and student leaders on campus who are speaking out to support the protests against racial injustice in our nation. Eliminating institutionalized racism, white privilege and racist violence will take many voices and much work.”

• Dr. Raymond Witte, dean of the Judith Herb College of Education: “We all want to feel safe when in the presence of the police. This will require time and honest dialogue because many, including myself now, don’t feel safe. I am now faced with the reality that police may not act impartially and without bias. To be honest, most of us are biased in some way. However, the decisions police make can have life and death outcomes.”

The next Dialogues on Diversity Virtual Roundtable is scheduled Thursday, June 25, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Access and panelist participation information will be released prior to the event, which is titled “The Death of George Floyd: Race and Anti-Blackness in America.”

University Libraries Offering Curbside Service for Faculty

Carlson Library is offering curbside services for faculty to pick up local materials from the Carlson and Mulford libraries’ collections.

Beginning Monday, May 4, the service is available by appointment weekdays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Faculty may request curbside service for local items through the University Libraries catalog. LaValley Law Library and OhioLink requests cannot currently be fulfilled and will result in an error message.

Once items are collected and processed, users will receive a notification to their Rocket email with a link to the webform to schedule a time to pick up the items at the Carlson Library loading dock. A follow-up message will be sent confirming the scheduled pickup time. For the health and safety of all library users and staff, respect social distancing guidelines during interactions with library personnel.

University Libraries continues to offer online services to students, faculty and staff, including reference and research assistance, digital course reserves and interlibrary loan.

For more information about accessing library services remotely and the curbside services available, visit the library’s remote services webpage.

University Libraries Offering Workshops This Semester

From conducting research for a paper or a job search to learning more about digital publishing, University Libraries has a workshop for you.

During spring semester, University Libraries is offering workshops designed to build practical skills and improve scholarship and research habits. No need to register — just show up.

UToledo librarians are here to help undergraduate and graduate students in their research success.

One-hour workshops will be:

• Life Hack: UToledo Libraries;

• Finding Resources Your Professor Will Love;

• Mastering Citations in EndNote;

• Scholarly Attribution and Citation: What You Need to Know;

• Business Research for the Job Hunt;

• American Psychological Association Updated: Using Seventh Edition APA Style; and

• Digital Publishing.

Workshop descriptions and details can be found on University Libraries’ website.

For questions or more information, contact Julia Martin, associate professor, director of reference and instruction, and business librarian, at julia.martin@utoledo.edu or 419.530.2492.

Reception for Health Science Campus Artist Showcase Set for Feb. 21

The 15th annual Health Science Campus Artist Showcase will take place from Monday, Feb. 17, through Wednesday, April 8, on the fourth floor of Mulford Library.

This year’s exhibit features work from more than 30 artists who are students, faculty and staff in the health sciences from Health Science and Main campuses, as well as The University of Toledo Medical Center.

Woodson

On display will be a variety of 2-D and 3-D artwork, including paintings, drawings, photography, sculpture and mixed media.

An artist reception will be held Friday, Feb. 21, from 4 to 6 p.m. on the fourth floor of Mulford Library. Dr. Donna Woodson, professor emerita of medicine, will give a talk, “Art is Good for Your Health,” at 4:30 p.m.

Woodson teaches the elective course Art and Medicine: Using Visual Literacy to Improve Diagnostic Skills in the College of Medicine and Life Sciences. She is a longstanding participant in the Health Science Campus Artist Showcase; three of her pieces will be featured in this year’s exhibit.

Light refreshments will be served at the reception, where attendees will have the chance to win books on art and medicine.

Visitors can view the artwork during regular library hours: Monday through Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to midnight; Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Sunday from 9 a.m. to midnight.

For more information on the free, public exhibit and reception, visit the University Libraries’ website or contact Jodi Jameson, assistant professor and nursing librarian at Mulford Library, and member of the artist showcase committee, at 419.383.5152 or jodi.jameson@utoledo.edu.

Assessing Effectiveness of Research Topic of Forum

“Telling Your Story With Publication Metrics” will be discussed at the next Future of Higher Education Forum Friday, Nov. 15.

Wade M. Lee-Smith, associate professor of library administration, will be the speaker at the event, which will take place from 10:30 a.m. to noon in Carlson Library Room 1005.

Lee-Smith

“My research and teaching interests include the changing ways in which scholars can document and interpret the effect their research has on the scholarly publication ecosystem,” Lee-Smith said.

A science librarian, Lee-Smith will share his wisdom from nearly 25 years of experience training researchers in efficient and effective use of tools to perform literature-based research.

The Future of Higher Education Forums are sponsored by the Office of the Provost.

Forums are held monthly throughout the academic year. Visit the Office of the Provost website to see upcoming topics, as well as to view past forums.

For more information, contact Dr. Amy Thompson, vice provost for faculty affairs and professor of public health, at amy.thompson4@utoledo.edu.

UToledo Banned Books Vigil to Take Place Sept. 26

Keep the light on and your mind open: Students, faculty, staff and area residents will answer riddles to win prizes, discuss ideas, and eat snacks at the UToledo Banned Books Week Vigil Thursday, Sept. 26, in Health and Human Services Building Room 1711B.

Every fall for 22 years, the University community has celebrated the right to read and think freely because “Censorship Leaves Us in the Dark.” This theme of the American Library Association’s Banned Books Week, Sept. 22-28, highlights the role reading plays in democracy.

The free, public open house champions the right to read, think, speak and create freely.

“The battle for the First Amendment is never won,” said Dr. Paulette D. Kilmer, UToledo professor of communication and coordinator of the UToledo Banned Books Vigil. “Somebody is always eager to censor books, music, TV, movies, art and other cultural forms of free expression in the name of protecting us from ourselves.”

Recently, a Catholic school in Nashville banned the “Harry Potter” series, claiming the books contain spells and curses. In 2018, censorship affected 531 resources, including books, magazines and databases, according to the American Library Association.

Many instances of banning and challenges are not reported, Kilmer said.

“All books are vital to our democracy,” she said. “The ones that lack lasting value will fall away because they will not merit literary attention or remain interesting to the next generation. All books are not equally good reading, but each person must determine for him or herself what to read without outside interference.”

The book festival calls attention to everyone’s right to read what he or she wants, Kilmer added.

UToledo faculty and area teachers are invited to bring classes. Attendance vouchers will be provided.

Programs will start every 30 minutes during the event, which coincides with the American Library Association’s Banned Books Week. Door prizes will be given out every half hour. The first 300 guests will receive a grab bag at the door. Pizza is scheduled to arrive around 3:45 p.m.

Topics and speakers will be:

• 9 a.m. — “How Copyright Rules Cramp Free Speech” by Lucy Duhon, collection sharing coordinator and scholarly communications librarian in University Libraries.

• 9:30 a.m. — “The Sound of Silence: What Does It Look Like?” by Dr. Monita Mungo, assistant professor of sociology.

10 a.m. — “Silence = Death” by Holly Hey, professor of film, with Dr. Allyson Day, assistant professor of disability studies.

• 10:30 a.m. — “Banning Pride?! Challenging ‘This Day in June’” by Dr. Sharon Barnes, associate professor and chair of women’s and gender studies.

• 11 a.m. — “Prison Resistance and the Right to Speak” by Dr. Renee Heberle, professor of political science and co-director of the Program in Law and Social Thought.

• 11:30 a.m. — “Super Hero Women Return to Save the World” by Warren Woodberry, Toledo author and playwright.

• Noon — “Banned in Boston: Lillian Hellman’s ‘The Children’s Hour’” by Holly Monsos, professor of theatre and associate dean of the College of Arts and Letters.

• 1 p.m. — “A Thousand Hands, A Million Stars: Speaking for Those Whose Voices Have Been Rendered Silent Through Human Sex Trafficking” by Jane Atwood, instructor in the Department of Music and University College.

• 1:30 p.m. — “Outrageous T-Shirts — Free Expression or Rudeness?” by Kilmer.

• 2 p.m. — “Google Docs, Social Media and Censorship: How Third-Party Corporations Are Deciding What You Can Study” by Dan McInnis, assistant lecturer in the Jesup Scott Honors College.

• 2:30 p.m. — “Banning Books in Nigeria: Findings From a Study of the Origin, Methods and Motivations” by Dr. Mojisola Tiamiyu, associate professor of psychology.

• 3 p.m. — Banned Books “Jeopardy” hosted by The Independent Collegian.

• 3:30 p.m. — “Why Democracies Need a Free Press” by Ben Morse, editor-in-chief of The Independent Collegian.

4 p.m. — “Don’t Look a Smith Horse in the Mouth,” an episode of “American Dad” that was fined by the Federal Communications Commission.

• 4:30 p.m. — “Woody Guthrie Songs” performance by Risa Cohen, local singer and storyteller.

Kilmer said the Banned Books Vigil would not be possible without the help of generous sponsors on campus and in the community. She gave a special thanks to the Office of the President; the Office of the Provost; the Jesup Scott Honors College; the College of Arts and Letters; the School of Visual and Performing Arts; Communication Department; Athletic Department; Disability Studies Department; Law and Social Thought Program; Inside-Outside Prison Exchange Program; and Phoenicia Cuisine.

For more information about the UToledo Banned Books Vigil, contact Kilmer at paulette.kilmer@utoledo.edu.

University Libraries Offering Workshops This Fall

Need help citing sources? Looking for a quick way to verify facts? University Libraries is offering workshops on different subjects during September, October and November.

“The purpose of the workshops is to help students effectively use and introduce them to library resources they might not know about,” said Julia Martin, associate professor and director of reference and instruction in University Libraries. “This outreach is especially important to new freshmen and graduate students to assist them with resources they may not be introduced to in the classroom.”

Topics for the workshops are:

• Business Research for the Job Hunt;

• All About Parents and Standards;

• Life Hack: UToledo Libraries;

• Social Media and Fake News: Fact Checking on the Fly;

• EndNote; and

• Scholarly Attribution and Citation: What You Need to Know.

All workshops will take place in either Carlson Library Room 1025 or 1027.

“Some workshops are general, like the upcoming Life Hack: UToledo Libraries, in which one of our librarians will help students discover library services to add quick strategies and techniques to make their University lives more efficient,” Martin said.

“Other workshops are more specific, such as Business Research for the Job Hunt, which is geared toward graduating students as they are on the verge of entering the workforce,” she added.

The workshop topics have been chosen to help students in areas in which librarians are uniquely qualified to engage the campus community in these information literacy skills, Martin said. University Libraries strives to promote lifelong learning, discovery and engagement.

More information and a schedule for the workshops can be found on the University Libraries’ website.

Nurse education history book published by UToledo Press receives award

“Caps, Capes, and Caring: The Legacy of Diploma Nursing Schools in Toledo” has won the 2018 Local History Publication Award in the Independent Scholar Division from the Bowling Green State University Center for Archival Collections.

Published by The University of Toledo Press, the book chronicles a century of nursing education in the Glass City.

Authors Patricia Ringos Beach, Susan J. Eisel, Maria E. Nowicki, Judy Harris Szor and Beth E. White will receive a $300 cash prize this fall at an event at Bowling Green, where they will discuss their work.

The BGSU contest was established to encourage and recognize authors of outstanding publications about northwest Ohio history.

This is the UToledo Press’ seventh award since 2006.

“This group of health-care professionals are so deserving of this honor,” Yarko Kuk, managing editor of the UToledo Press said. “They interviewed countless fellow nurses and produced a book that documents more than 100 years of the evolution of nursing schools in Toledo. The memories, stories and history contained in ‘Caps’ would have been lost were it not for the efforts of these dedicated women. Their book offers a wonderful peek into the field of nursing as it evolved over the past century.”

“Caps, Capes, and Caring” tells the story of the eight hospital-based diploma schools of nursing that were operating in Toledo from 1893 to 1999.

The authors, all hospital diploma school graduates, taught together as nursing faculty at the Toledo Hospital School of Nursing. Beach, Eisel, Nowicki and Szor are alumnae of MCO/MUO/UToledo, where they received advanced degrees in nursing and education.

To write the book, the authors interviewed nearly 100 Toledo diploma school graduates. Their memories and stories are celebrated in the book, which also includes historical images and photographs.

“I was a bit curious about how the book would turn out, considering we were working with five authors,” Kuk said. “When they initially pitched the book idea, they were describing something far different than the 320-plus-page work we have today. They thought it might be around 100 pages with about 100 photos. But as they turned in the manuscript, chapter by chapter, it became clear we had something really special. When I sat down with them after our first major edit of the entire draft and told them we were around 280 pages without photos, they just could not believe it. I had to tell them several times they had something really exceptional before it sank in.”

“We are so pleased to have won this award,” Beau Case, dean of University Libraries, said. “The prize both recognizes the hard work of Yarko Kuk and the authors, as well as the continued valuable contributions to local history that the Press makes.”

“Caps, Capes, and Caring: The Legacy of Diploma Nursing Schools in Toledo” is $24.95 and available on the website of The University of Toledo Press.