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UToledo to Display AIDS Memorial Quilt Ahead of World AIDS Day

The University of Toledo will host an exhibition of more than a dozen panels from the AIDS Memorial Quilt in recognition of World AIDS Day.

The exhibit, which is a partnership between the UToledo Department of Art at the Center for the Visual Arts and The University of Toledo Medical Center Ryan White Program, will run from Friday, Nov. 15, through Friday, Dec. 6, in the Center for the Visual Arts Gallery.

A free, public lecture featuring Jeanne White-Ginder will open the exhibition Friday, Nov. 15, at 6 p.m. in the Toledo Museum of Art Peristyle.

White-Ginder is the mother of Ryan White, an Indiana teenager who contracted HIV in the mid 1980s following a blood transfusion. Their fight against discrimination and for him to return to school gained national attention. He had become a face of the AIDS crisis in America by the time he died in 1990 at the age of 18.

Shortly after his death, Congress passed a bill to establish a federally funded program to care for people with HIV/AIDS that would eventually carry his name as the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program.

White-Ginder has remained a steadfast HIV/AIDS activist, fighting against stigma and advocating for testing as a way to reduce and prevent spread of the disease.

Jeanne White-Ginder with her son, Ryan

“I want to be around to see the end of AIDS, and I think we’re close to that. This is something Ryan started and advocated so hard for. I enjoy talking about Ryan’s life and the difference he made,” she said. “I think it’s important now to hear stories of those affected. That’s why the quilt coming to Toledo is important. You actually see the faces and the stories. These people were loved and they were cared about. We do not want these people forgotten.”

Joining White-Ginder at the kickoff event will be Robert Sember, an artist, researcher and educator, whose work focuses on the intersection of public health and art. He’s a part-time faculty member at the New School in New York City.

The AIDS Memorial Quilt was started in 1987. In the three decades since, it has grown to include more than 48,000 panels. Nearly 100,000 individuals are memorialized on the quilt.

Panels to be displayed locally include several recognizing individuals from northwest Ohio, as well as a number of well-known artists, photographers, filmmakers and activists.

The exhibit is supported by the Ann Wayson Locher Memorial Fund for HIV Care.

Dr. Mysoon Rizk, a UToledo professor of art history and one of the organizers of the exhibit, said as the AIDS epidemic spread in the 1980s, artistic communities in major U.S. cities such as New York were hit particularly hard. Because of that, she said, artists have played an important role in fighting to change attitudes toward the disease and giving voice to what it means to be affected.

“Staging such an exhibition makes for educational opportunities to focus discussion on AIDS and HIV, both of which still ravage many communities around the world and both of which remain associated with stigmatizing experiences,” Rizk said. “Young people who never learned about the history of the AIDS crisis may experience consciousness-raising and greater awareness about diseases, whether transmitted sexually or by any other means, such as blood transfusions, as well as to learn about the incredible UTMC Ryan White Program.”

The Ryan White Program at UTMC offers high-quality comprehensive care for individuals and families affected by HIV/AIDS. The program offers adult primary care, mental health counseling, case management, advocacy and HIV testing in Lucas County and the surrounding area. In 2018, the program served more than 1,000 individuals.

UTMC to Host Educational Program on CryoMAZE, Other Treatments for Atrial Fibrillation

The University of Toledo Medical Center now offers an innovative, minimally invasive surgical treatment for patients with atrial fibrillation, eliminating the need to continue on blood thinners.

The procedure, called CryoMAZE, uses precision application of extreme cold inside the heart, establishing a barrier that prevents stray electrical signals from causing the heart to beat irregularly.

“The goal of this procedure is to kill the cells without damaging the walls of the heart. This is why this procedure does not accidentally make a hole in the heart which can happen with heat-based procedures. If the cells are dead, they cannot conduct electricity. That makes a fence so the electrical impulses don’t spill over into the rest of atrium. It’s like putting insulation on a wire — you are letting electrical impulse to go through only in the normal path without spreading around randomly,” said Dr. Saqib Masroor, chief of the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery at UTMC.

Masroor will give a free, educational presentation on atrial fibrillation and the latest treatment options, including minimally invasive CryoMAZE, Thursday, Nov. 7, at 6:30 p.m. in the Center for Creative Education on Health Science Campus.

For more information or to register for the event, call 419.383.6939.

Atrial fibrillation, or AFib, is the most common type of heart arrhythmia in the United States; it affects between 2.7 million and 6.1 million Americans.

In AFib, the heart’s upper chambers, or atria, don’t beat in coordination with the heart’s lower chambers or ventricles. That can lead to pooling of the blood and clotting in the atria, creating an increased risk of congestive heart failure and stroke.

Blood thinners are commonly used to reduce the risk of stroke in AFib patients, but they can increase the risk of bleeding. Other options for treating AFib require open-heart surgery or the use of catheters threaded through major arteries in either the groin or neck to get to the heart.

In the minimally invasive CryoMAZE procedure, a surgeon makes a small incision in the right side of the chest. Through that, they’re able to access the outside of the heart and create scar tissue with the specialized probe that is cooled to approximately -60 degrees Celsius. A surgeon also can put a clip on the left atrial through the same incision.

The recovery time in the hospital is typically three to five days.

Masroor said success rates for CryoMAZE are approximately 90%. An added benefit of using cold rather than heat to create scar tissue is that there isn’t a risk of putting a hole in the heart.

“Many people don’t know their options beyond blood thinners,” Masroor said. “We want to educate people that there are many safe options that will prevent them from having to take blood thinners and have complications from atrial fibrillation.”

Drive to Collect Stuffed Animals, Books for UToledo Medical Center Patients

The Master of Science in Biomedical Science Volunteer Patient Advocate Assistants will hold a stuffed animal and book drive Tuesday through Thursday, Oct. 29 to 31, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in The University of Toledo Medical Center Four Seasons Bistro.

The volunteer student group works throughout The University of Toledo Medical Center, with much of their time spent in the Emergency Room. Students who see patients in the ER know that a stuffed animal can make a difference in a child’s experience while those that see patients throughout the medical center can attest to the joy and accompaniment a book can bring a patient throughout their care at the hospital.

Master of Science in Biomedical Science Volunteer Patient Advocate Assistants showed off some of the stuffed animals and books they collected during a previous drive.

“A stuffed animal or book can considerably calm a patient and help put their mind at ease. With these simple gestures, ER and hospital staff are able to provide the effective and compassionate care UTMC is known for,” said Jihad Aoun, a member of the Master of Science in Biomedical Science Volunteer Patient Advocate Assistants.

All stuffed animal donations must be new, and books of all reading levels should be new or gently used. Monetary donations also will be accepted. All proceeds will be used to purchase stuffed animals for pediatric patients in the UTMC Emergency Department. This is the third year for the program.

Many of the group’s members plan to attend medical school.

“As patient advocates, we aim to facilitate improved medical care by advocating for the patients we come in contact with,” said Mirlinda Elmazi, a Master of Science in Biomedical Science Volunteer Patient Advocate Assistant. “We do this by improving doctor-patient communication with explanations of complicated medical concepts in terms that patients can understand. We hope to leave the program with effective communications skills so that, as physicians, we are able to better communicate with our patients and provide them with the best possible care.”

Satellites Auxiliary’s Fall Book Fair to Take Place Oct. 28-30

Books galore and more — that’s what you can expect at the Satellites Auxiliary’s Collective Goods Fall Book Fair Monday through Wednesday, Oct. 28-30, in the UToledo Medical Center’s Four Seasons Bistro Atrium.

The sale hours will be Monday and Tuesday from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Wednesday from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.

“Stop by and check out all the books. There will be hundreds of books in all categories for all ages,” Lynn Brand, president of the Satellites Auxiliary. “Remember, it’s never too early to start shopping for the holidays.”

Cash, credit cards and payroll deduction will be accepted.

A portion of the proceeds will benefit scholarships and patient programs.

The Satellites Auxiliary promotes education, research and service programs; provides support of patient programs in accordance with the needs and approval of administration; conducts fundraising events; and offers volunteer services.

Serving Healthcare Needs of Transgender Population Topic of Upcoming Lecture

Providing culturally sensitive care to transgender individuals will be the topic of the 12th annual Dorothy Hussain Distinguished Lectureship hosted by The University of Toledo College of Nursing.

Dr. Jordon Bosse, a registered nurse and project manager of research and education for Boulder Care Inc., will be the keynote speaker.

Bosse

The free, public lecture, “What’s the ‘T’? How to Provide Patient-Centered, Culturally Sensitive Care to Transgender People,” will be held Tuesday, Oct. 29, from 1 to 3 p.m. in Collier Building Room 1000. Register in advance through the College of Nursing website. Students do not need to register.

Bosse, who holds a Ph.D. in nursing science from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, has worked with vulnerable and marginalized populations in both the social service and healthcare fields for more than two decades. Much of his work has been focused on the needs of the LGBTQA+ community.

According to Bosse, many transgender or nonbinary people have had negative experiences in healthcare because of difficulty finding providers who have the knowledge, skills and experience to work with transgender and nonbinary people, a lack of understanding from physicians, or even the binary choices presented on forms and electronic medical records.

One of the best things healthcare providers can do, he said, is educate themselves.

“Caring for transgender and nonbinary patients isn’t a clinical specialty. You will likely come in contact with people from diverse gender groups in the course of your practice. The only way to know is to ask,” he said. “Get in the habit of asking all patients what they would like to be called, what pronouns they use and then use them. If people give responses you’ve not heard before, it’s OK to ask for more information.”

Bosse will be joined by Dr. Michelle Boose and Dr. Robert Gottfried, both assistant professors in the Department of Family Medicine in the UToledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences, for the conversation on serving healthcare needs of the transgender population.

The lecture is named after the late Dorothy Gladys Hussain, whose professional career spanned 32 years as a staff nurse and critical care nurse at the former Medical College of Ohio Hospital. She was known for patient advocacy and championing patients’ rights.

Photographer to Zoom in on Travels at Satellites’ Luncheon

“Southern Exposure: Travels in South America” is the topic of a talk to be given by photographer Lowell Simon at the Satellites Auxiliary’s luncheon Wednesday, Oct. 23.

The event will start at noon in Health Education Building Room 105 on Health Science Campus.

Registration will start at 11:30 a.m.

Those who attend may bring their own lunches to the free event, or they may pay $7 — or $5 with a guest — for a box lunch that will include a fruit salad and dessert. Cash or check payable to the Satellites Auxiliary will be accepted.

Complimentary valet service will be available at the Medical Pavilion orthopaedic entrance.

Satellites volunteers also will be collecting new stuffed animals for children in The University of Toledo Medical Center Emergency Department.

The Satellites Auxiliary is a volunteer group designed to promote education, research and service programs; provide support of patient programs in accordance with the needs and approval of administration; conduct fundraising events; and provide services.

To RSVP or for more information, call Ray or Donna Darr at 419.382.0054; Carol Okenka at 419.654.5326; or Pat Windham at 419.385.4808.

Day of Giving College Events and Giving Stations

UToledo’s third annual Day of Giving will take place Tuesday and Wednesday, Oct. 15 and 16.

The 36-hour campaign, “Rocket Forward: You Launch Lives,” will begin at midnight Oct. 15 and end at noon Oct. 16.

Several events are planned Tuesday, Oct. 15:

Day of Giving Fall Festival — 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Centennial Mall

• Student organizations will host booths with games.

• The Rocket Marching Band and UToledo cheerleaders will perform.

• President Sharon L. Gaber will greet students from noon to 12:30 p.m.

• The festival also will offer a dog-petting station, corn hole games, a basketball contest, pie in the face, pumpkin bowling and pumpkin golf.

College of Business and Innovation — 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Savage & Associates Business Complex Second-Floor Atrium

• Giving station with ice cream.

Judith Herb College of Education — 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Gillham Hall

• Giving station with popcorn.

College of Health and Human Services — 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and Wednesday, Oct. 16, 8 to 10:30 a.m. in the Health and Human Services Building Atrium

• Giving station with popcorn, other snacks and prizes.

Jesup Scott Honors College — 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. outside MacKinnon Hall

• Giving station with snacks.

College of Law — 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on the Law Center Patio

• Fall Fest hosted by the Student Bar Association: Donate to decorate mini-pumpkins; play corn hole, ring toss and horseshoes; and eat kettle corn, caramel apples and cider.

Student Recreation Center — 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

• Giving station; popcorn from 2 to 6 p.m.

University College — 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Wednesday, Oct. 16, 9 to 10:30 a.m. in Rocket Hall

• Giving station with popcorn, snacks, and a chance to spin the wheel to win prizes with a donation.

The University of Toledo Medical Center — starting at 9 a.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, Oct. 15 and 16, in the Four Seasons Bistro

• Giving station in the cafeteria.

Colleges of Nursing; Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; and Medicine and Life Sciences — 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Collier Building Lobby

College of Nursing will host a Day of Giving party with a giving station, snacks, a pumpkin decorating contest, music and entertainment. President Sharon L. Gaber and Health Science Campus deans will be on hand for Day of Giving selfie photos with students, faculty and staff.

Give online at rocketforward.utoledo.edu Oct. 15-16 and share your UToledo story on social media at #RocketForward.

Hussain Lecture to Chart Transformation of Medical Science

The great Greek physician Galen of Pergamon was one of the most influential forces in medical history, with his theories informing the profession for centuries.

Unfortunately, many of Galen’s ideas were wrong.

“For nearly 2,000 years, we were practicing medicine like it was the Stone Age. There was nothing scientific about it,” said Dr. Syed Tasnim Raza, a cardiothoracic surgeon and associate professor of surgery at Columbia University Medical Center.

Tasnim Raza

Thankfully, real scientific discovery eventually won out, helping to lead medicine into the cutting-edge field it is today.

Tasnim Raza, who has spent the last decade studying the history of medicine after more than three decades as a heart surgeon in Buffalo, N.Y., will outline those radical changes at the 11th annual S. Amjad Hussain Visiting Lecture in the History of Medicine and Surgery Thursday, Oct. 17, at 5 p.m.

The free, public lecture will be held in Health Education Building Room 110 on Health Science Campus. RSVPs are requested; email hscevents@utoledo.edu or call 419.383.6300.

One of Galen’s primary mistakes was assuming the anatomy of animals he dissected was wholly applicable to humans. For 1,300 years, no one dared question him.

“The thinking was, ‘If Galen said it, it has to be true,’” said Tasnim Raza. “We need to have the strength to challenge conventional wisdom, dogma and current thinking to improve and continue to change.”

The S. Amjad Hussain Visiting Lecture in the History of Medicine and Surgery was created in honor of Hussain, professor emeritus of cardiovascular surgery and humanities, a former member of the UToledo Board of Trustees, and columnist for The Blade.

“Dr. Tasnim Raza has had a deep interest in the history of medicine and has just finished a book manuscript on the history of heart surgery. He is a man who is well-versed in not only the subject of surgery, but also in the arts and humanities,” Hussain said. “The study of the history of medicine is important because it shows us the distance we have covered and the path we have traversed to reach the present. History being a continuum, we cannot chart a future unless we know the past.”

In part, the lecture series helped further inspire Tasnim Raza’s interest in the history of medicine after he came to Toledo in 2013 to hear author Wendy Moore speak about her biography of the 18th-century Scottish physician Dr. John Hunter.

Tasnim Raza’s sister also has presented the Hussain lecture. Dr. Azra Raza, a well-known oncologist and cancer researcher, and Chan Soon-Shiong Professor of Medicine at the Columbia University Medical Center, visited Toledo in 2017.

Azra Raza will join Tasnim Raza in Toledo to kick off a book tour for her forthcoming title, “The First Cell: And the Human Costs of Pursuing Cancer to the Last.”

Satellites to Hold Overnight Sale This Week

The Satellites Auxiliary’s Carline Leathers sale will start at noon Thursday, Oct. 10, and run through 3 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11, in The University of Toledo Medical Center’s Four Seasons Bistro Atrium.

Fashion outerwear, footwear, handbags, accessories and more from Kenneth Cole, Pelle Pelle, Sean John, Steve Madden, Nine West and Anne Klein will be for sale.

Cash, credit cards and payroll deduction will be accepted.

A portion of the proceeds will benefit patient programs.

The Satellites Auxiliary is a volunteer group designed to promote education, research and service programs; provide support of patient programs in accordance with the needs and approval of administration; conduct fundraising events; and provide services.

For more information on the sale, contact Lynn Brand, president of the Satellites, at lynn.brand@utoledo.edu.

Satellites to Hold $7 Sale Sept. 25-27

It’s a lucky number: The $7-plus sale will be held by the Satellites Auxiliary Wednesday through Friday, Sept. 25-27, in The University of Toledo Medical Center’s Four Seasons Bistro Atrium.

“We’ll have name-brand, high-quality items for women and men,” Lynn Brand, president of the Satellites Auxiliary, said. “We’ll have products that are $7, as well as items that are specially priced.”

Check out apparel, seasonal accessories, jewelry, gadgets and more from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Wednesday, from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday, and from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday.

Cash, credit cards and payroll deduction will be accepted.

A portion of the proceeds will benefit the auxiliary.

The Satellites Auxiliary is a volunteer group designed to promote education, research and service programs; provide support of patient programs in accordance with the needs and approval of administration; conduct fundraising events; and provide services.

For more information on the sale, contact Brand at lynn.brand@utoledo.edu.