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Trustees approve college merger, housing rates

The new College of Health and Human Services was approved Monday by the UT Board of Trustees.

The new college is a merger of the College of Health Sciences and the College of Social Justice and Human Service and will be led by Dr. Christopher Ingersoll, dean of the College of Health Sciences. The merger will be effective July 1 and in place for the 2016-17 academic year.

Business Hlogo 1c BlackThe trustees also approved a 2 percent increase in housing rates for on-campus residence halls in an effort to remain competitive while also covering rising operational costs.

In the past, the University had included housing fee changes as part of the annual budget, but opted to make the decision earlier this year so that prospective students and current students could make better-informed decisions about their housing plans for the upcoming school year.

Recreational therapy recognized as a best value degree program

The University of Toledo offers the country’s best value degree in recreational therapy, according to College Values Online.

UT’s bachelor of science degree in recreational therapy is listed No. 1 by the website in its rankings of the 30 best parks, recreation and leisure degree programs in the United States.

College-Values-Online-Top-Degree-Programs-2016-300x292UT ranked highest based on the criteria of low tuition, high return on investment, high percentage of students receiving financial aid, and the number of minors, concentrations and areas of emphasis offered within the program.

“Parks, recreation, tourism and hospitality is a massive global industry, and a degree from a reputable university in your specific area of interest can get you off to a great start,” College Values Online editors wrote. “In today’s economy, with student debt piling up ever higher on graduates, value is an important consideration. Cost, financial aid, program flexibility, and return on investment are all major concerns. That’s why we focus not just on the quality, but the value of the degree programs in our ranking.”

The editors noted UT’s Recreational Therapy Program is accredited by the Council on Accreditation of Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Related Professions, and offers concentrations in pre-occupational therapy, therapeutic arts, geriatrics, pediatrics and communication.

College Values Online’s mission is to provide assistance in selecting the best college for each individual situation by offering rankings of schools and various degree programs.
Visit collegevaluesonline.com for additional information.

Colleges to merge pending trustee approval

The merger of the College of Health Sciences and the College of Social Justice and Human Service will go before the Board of Trustees in January for its consideration following the conceptual approval by The University of Toledo’s president, interim provost, and the colleges’ faculty and administration.

The newly named College of Health and Human Services will be established July 1 and will be led by Dr. Christopher Ingersoll, dean of the College of Health Sciences. Ingersoll also will serve as interim dean of the College of Social Justice and Human Service from January through July following the retirement in December of Dr. Thomas Gutteridge.

“Thank you for your support for this merger,” Ingersoll wrote in a memo distributed to both colleges. “I look forward to working with you, individually and collectively, as appropriate to transform this agreement into reality.”

Ingersoll wrote that the college councils had already initiated discussions about the merger and will be moving forward to draft a new constitution and bylaws.

Faculty and leaders in the two colleges also will work in the coming semester to organize the new college’s programs into four schools. In addition, UT’s public health program will be housed in the College of Health and Human Services, and the higher education program will shift to the Judith Herb College of Education.

The program groupings for the four to-be-named schools will be:

School 1
Health Care Administration
Health Education
Health Information Administration
Public Health

School 2

Criminal Justice
Legal Specialties
Social Work

School 3
Athletic Training
Exercise Science
Occupational Therapy
Physical Therapy
Recreation Administration
Recreational Therapy

School 4
Counselor Education
School Psychology
Speech-Language Pathology

Chairs for each school will be identified in the months ahead according to institutional policy.

“I would like to thank the faculty of the colleges of Health Science and Social Justice and Human Service, as well as Dean Gutteridge, Dean Ingersoll and Interim Provost John Barrett for their leadership in this area,” said UT President Sharon L. Gaber. “The new College of Health and Human Services will strengthen educational, research and patient care opportunities for our students and our faculty.”

CNN journalist to deliver commencement address Dec. 19

Christi Paul, anchor of CNN New Day Weekends and HLN’s Daily Share, will address graduates at The University of Toledo’s fall commencement Saturday, Dec. 19, at 10 a.m. in Savage Arena.

The UT graduate and Bellevue, Ohio, native, who also will receive an honorary degree during the ceremony, will address more than 2,000 candidates for degrees, including 138 doctoral candidates, 556 master’s degree candidates and 1,372 bachelor’s degree candidates.

Paul

Paul

The ceremony will be streamed live at http://video.utoledo.edu.

This will mark the first University of Toledo commencement for UT President Sharon L. Gaber.

“From her time at UT to her successful career at CNN, Christi Paul has devoted her life to thoughtful curiosity, learning, and helping others with the power of information,” Gaber said. “She has been at the forefront of many major news stories of our time. The award-winning journalist and advocate for women and children is an inspiring voice who will offer a passionate message to our graduates and guests.”

The national journalist graduated from UT in 1993 with a bachelor of arts degree in communication with a focus on broadcast journalism.

“I’m humbled and honored to give the commencement speech and so grateful to UT, the professors who helped me grow, the staff who guided me to solid internships, and the friends I made along the way,” Paul said. “I will always credit UT for giving me my springboard into the journalism arena.”

Paul has covered many high-profile events throughout her distinguished career; these include President Barack Obama’s second inauguration, Hurricane Sandy, and the Casey Anthony murder trial. She was in the anchor chair, walking heartbroken viewers through the early hours of the tragic shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School and Virginia Tech.

Prior to joining CNN and HLN in 2003, Paul worked as an anchor and reporter in Phoenix and Boise, Idaho. The Idaho Press Club honored Paul for her series about a brave 4-year-old girl who underwent a five-organ transplant. Paul began her career at WDTV in Clarksburg, W.Va.

The wife and mother of three also is passionate about helping children. Along with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, Paul is co-founder of the “Find Our Children” series that airs on HLN. Viewers have helped bring home 35 missing kids as a result of the news profile segments. The center honored Paul in 2012 with its prestigious Hope Award for her efforts to make the world a safer place for children.

Paul serves on the National Advisory Council for the One Love Foundation, which works with teens to help end dating violence. She also serves on the advisory board for When Georgia Smiled that helps victims of domestic violence and sexual assault find healing, safety and joy.

UT recognized Paul in 2006 as an Outstanding Alumna of the former College of Arts and Sciences.

The fall commencement ceremony will recognize graduates from the colleges of Adult and Lifelong Learning; Business and Innovation; Communication and the Arts; Judith Herb College of Education; Health Sciences; Languages, Literature and Social Sciences; Medicine and Life Sciences; Natural Sciences and Mathematics; Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; and Social Justice and Human Service.

Other commencement ceremonies that will take place are:

• College of Engineering — graduate commencement Thursday, Dec. 17, at 5 p.m.; undergraduate commencement Saturday, Dec. 19, at 3 p.m. Both ceremonies will be held in Nitschke Hall Auditorium.

• College of Nursing: Friday, Dec. 18, at 1 p.m. in Nitschke Hall Auditorium.

For more information, visit utoledo.edu/commencement.

Tailgate party, football game to benefit cancer survivors

The Friday after Thanksgiving is usually about shopping. This year, it is about surviving.

The University of Toledo Center for Health and Successful Living is organizing a tailgate party for cancer survivors and their families before the Rockets’ football game versus Western Michigan Friday, Nov. 27.

cancer Tailgate event webThe free tailgate party will start at 10 a.m. in parking lot 1S on the east side of the Health and Human Services Building before the noon kickoff in the Glass Bowl.

The Center for Health and Successful Living also is selling discounted game tickets that anyone can purchase for $12 with $2 going toward the center for screening and outreach purposes. Use the code “CHSL” when buying the tickets at http://utrockets.com. Reservations for the tailgate party are appreciated.

“We wanted to thank our survivors for coming to our programs, and we wanted to connect our survivors to each other,” said Dr. Amy Thompson, co-director of the center and UT health education professor. “We want to celebrate their survivorship journey and create some awareness about the center.”

Since its inception two years ago, the center has educated more than 5,000 people and screened more than 500 women for breast cancer.

The Center for Health and Successful Living, located on the first floor of the Health and Human Services Building on Main Campus, offers a variety of low-cost health promotion and disease prevention services, including health coaching, health screenings, case management, customized exercise programs and support groups.

“We are an arm of the Eleanor N. Dana Cancer Center; we are Dana’s survivorship program,” Thompson said. “We do free screenings, mobile units and education in the community. We also do patient navigation. People will call us and say, ‘I need help finding a physician.’ We also help people who can’t afford health services.

“We have known people who have walked 5 miles to get a free mammogram,” Thompson said. “The more we work with people in the community, the more we see the need. Our students were doing health coaching at one point, and we were finding that people couldn’t even identify a vegetable.”

While the center is open to anyone, Thompson said specific attention is paid to minorities, the LGBT community and those suffering from mental illness.

“We try to serve the mentally ill because they live 25 years less on average,” she said. “They don’t get screened because they are focused on their mental health instead of getting a colonoscopy or a mammogram. We try to provide services for everyone, but we try to focus on people who are underserved.”

Thompson started the center with Dr. Tim Jordan, UT health education professor, because her mom, Gladys, had breast cancer.

“My mom had to go to so many different places to get support for her cancer. I thought, ‘Wouldn’t it be great to have it all in once place?’” Thompson said.

Jordan said a large part of the center’s mission is to recruit and retain high-quality students to UT while collaborating with other academic departments.

“We want to create more opportunities for students to gain more skills in their majors,” he said. “We have students in occupational therapy, social work and physical therapy, among other disciplines, who intern and volunteer in the center. We have even had international students specifically come to UT to intern in our center.”

As the center evolves, it has added many social events to its calendar. For instance, the Pink Sneakers walking group meets at 6 p.m. on Mondays, Wednesday and Fridays. The center also hosts a Survivorship Book Club, which is meeting Monday, Nov. 30, at 7 p.m.

“A lot of these programs are things that people have asked us to do,” Thompson said.
“Last year, we had a Christmas party for survivors at my home. Everyone had to say one thing he or she was grateful for this year. Someone said, ‘I am grateful that I had cancer because I would have never met all of you at the center without this diagnosis.’”

Thompson and Jordan are working to secure more funding for the center, which runs on $10,000 a year, to be able to offer additional services. Thompson and Jordan run the center in their free time.

“This is a labor of love, but if we had more money, we could do more for the community,” Thompson said.

To make a donation to the Center for Health and Successful Living, contact Malory Sykes, major gifts officer in the Office of Development, at malory.sykes@utoledo.edu or 419.530.5428.

Cancer survivors, families invited to Halloween party

The scariness of cancer will take a backseat to the fun of Halloween at a party for cancer survivors and their families.

The University of Toledo Center for Health and Successful Living is hosting a Halloween party Wednesday, Oct. 28, at 7 p.m. in the Health and Human Services Building Suite 1100 on Main Campus.

The free event is open to local cancer survivors and their families. The evening will include pumpkin carving, snacks, movies and other Halloween-related activities.

“We wanted to do something fun with family and kids,” said Dr. Amy Thompson, co-director of the Center for Health and Successful Living. “We wanted to give them something else to focus on other than cancer, and provide these families an opportunity to see what we offer at the center.”

Thompson said too often the family members of cancer survivors are overlooked when it comes to getting support.

“When cancer affects one person, it affects the whole family,” Thompson said.

The Center for Health and Successful Living, which opened in October 2013, offers a variety of low-cost health promotion and disease prevention services, including health coaching, health screenings, case management, customized exercise programs and support groups.

Reservations are appreciated, but they are not necessary. Call 419.530.5199 or email jessica.schulte@rockets.utoledo.edu.

Clinic offers free screenings for UT community

The University of Toledo Speech-Language-Hearing Clinic is offering free hearing screenings for UT students, faculty and staff.

“A hearing screening is very quick; it only takes approximately five minutes, but it can help determine if a person would benefit from a full hearing evaluation,” said Amy Remer, coordinator at the Speech-Language-Hearing Clinic.

Located in Health and Human Services Building Room 1240 on Main Campus, the clinic offers a wide range of services for communication disorders and provides communication and learning problem evaluations, along with separate audiological evaluations.

Services are conducted by graduate and advanced undergraduate students in the UT Speech-Language Pathology Program under the supervision of certified, licensed speech-language pathologist and audiologists.

The clinic offers all services at a discounted self-pay rate, including hearing evaluation for $25.

All services are by appointment only.

To schedule an appointment, call the Speech-Language-Hearing Clinic at 419.530.4339.

Back-to-school drive, kick-off social to be held Aug. 31

Join University of Toledo Alumni Affiliates Monday, Aug. 31, for the Shoes, Socks and Underwear Drive and kick-off social from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Gradkowki’s, located at 1440 Secor Road in the Gateway.

“It’s a chance for affiliates to get together and kick off the school year,” said Tamara Talmage, president of the Judith Herb College of Education, Health Science, and Social Justice and Human Services Alumni Affiliate.

Donations will be collected for the Shoes, Socks and Underwear Drive during the event, and participants can sample free appetizers.

“Other local organizations started collecting backpacks and school supplies to donate in the area, so we talked to principals to see what else students needed,” Talmage said. “Last year, we only collected shoes, but this year socks and underwear were added to the drive after hearing there was a need for them.”

Grey, black, brown or white tennis shoes or dress shoes and socks are needed for students in grades K-8 in children’s sizes 1 to 6 or toddler sizes 10 to 13.

Underwear donations are needed for younger students.

Throughout August and September, donations can be dropped off Monday through Friday from 8:15 a.m. to 5 p.m. in Driscoll Alumni Center Room 2001 on Main Campus.

For more information, visit toledoalumni.org or call 419.530.2586.

UT sorority members visit high school prom night

Senior prom: a night high school students spend dancing, laughing, chatting and eating with their friends. Some are lucky enough to be there with a special guy or girl.

Thomas Huffman posed for a photo with some of his dates for the prom, from left, Alpha Xi Delta members Sydney Miller, Kirsten Zalewski, Becca Potts, Maddie Burke, Gabbi Radford, Sydney Helsinger, Liz Russell, Jenn Lohrman, Courtney Howe, Broghan Gasser, Megan Graber and Corinne Porter.

Thomas Huffman posed for a photo with some of his dates for the prom, from left, Alpha Xi Delta members Sydney Miller, Kirsten Zalewski, Becca Potts, Maddie Burke, Gabbi Radford, Sydney Helsinger, Liz Russell, Jenn Lohrman, Courtney Howe, Broghan Gasser, Megan Graber and Corinne Porter.

That’s the experience Alpha Xi Delta’s Programs Vice President Jennifer Huffman’s younger brother, Thomas, had at his prom last month — only he had 16 dates.

Thomas has level-one autism, which prevented him from enjoying dances throughout high school. So when Huffman’s parents told her that her brother didn’t have a prom group with less than a week before the big night, she got the idea to ask her sorority sisters if they would be interested in being his dates. Alpha Xi Delta’s philanthropy is Autism Speaks, the world’s leading autism science and advocacy organization.

Sixteen members of the sorority attended Lima Central Catholic’s prom April 25.

“It was a complete surprise,” Huffman said. “He had no idea we were coming.”

Jennifer Huffman, vice president of programs for Alpha Xi Delta, gave a hug to her brother, Thomas, before he left for the prom.

Jennifer Huffman, vice president of programs for Alpha Xi Delta, gave a hug to her brother, Thomas, before he left for the prom.

After surprising Thomas at his home in Lima, the girls took numerous pictures with him. Then after dinner they escorted Thomas to the dance, where the school allowed them to join him for the first song of the evening. The song was “Can You Feel the Love Tonight” from Thomas’s favorite movie, “The Lion King” — a film he likes so much that he can recite the whole script in 12 different languages.

Each girl took a turn dancing with Thomas during the song.

“He’s never really done something like this before, so I just thought it was really cool that everyone drove down for him,” Huffman said. “It made it a really special time for him.”

After the sorority girls left, Thomas was awarded prom king. While receiving his crown, “I Just Can’t Wait to Be King,” another classic tune from Thomas’s favorite film, was played.

“It’s my favorite memory of Alpha Xi Delta so far,” said Gabrielle Radford, a sophomore majoring in exercise science and member of the sorority. “It was so great standing in that circle dancing with him; we were all starting to cry, and he sang every single word to [‘Can You Feel the Love Tonight’]. It was just such a great night.”

Thomas graduated May 9. He plans to attend the Lima branch of Ohio State University this fall.

Ohio Senate president, international business leader to address UT graduates May 10

Leaders of government and business will address The University of Toledo graduates at spring commencement ceremonies Sunday, May 10.

During the 9:30 a.m. ceremony, Sen. Keith Faber, representative of the 12th State Senate District in western Ohio, will speak to graduates from the colleges of Adult and Lifelong Learning, Health Sciences, Social Justice and Human Service, and the Judith Herb College of Education.

Roy Armes, CEO, president and chair of Cooper Tire and Rubber Co., will speak during the 2 p.m. ceremony for the colleges of Business and Innovation, Communication and the Arts, Natural Sciences and Mathematics, and Languages, Literature and Social Sciences.

There are 2,962 candidates for degrees, including 165 doctoral candidates, 646 master’s candidates and 2,023 bachelor’s candidates. The remaining 128 candidates are for education specialist, graduate certificates or associate’s degrees.

The ceremony will be broadcast live on video.utoledo.edu.

Faber

Faber

Faber will receive an honorary doctor of public administration.

He represents the 12th State Senate District in western Ohio, encompassing all of Allen, Champaign, Mercer and Shelby counties, as well as portions of Auglaize, Darke and Logan counties. Faber serves as president of the Ohio Senate. He previously served three terms in the Ohio House of Representatives.

Faber also served on several Senate committees involved with fiscal management, including as chair of the Senate Standing Committee on Government Oversight and vice chairman of the Senate Insurance, Commerce and Labor Committee. He represents the Senate on the State Ballot Board, the Joint Legislative Ethics Committee, the Legislative Service Commission Board, and the Redistricting, Reapportionment and Demographic Research Legislative Taskforce.

He has received many accolades for his work; these include the Guardian of Small Business Award, the Outstanding Legislator of the Year in 2004, and being named a Watchdog of the Treasury five times.

Faber has been an active member in legal organizations, including the Ohio State Bar Association’s Public Understanding of the Law Advisory Board and the Board of Editors of the Ohio Lawyer Magazine.

He is the principal partner with Faber & Associates in Celina, Ohio, a law firm specializing in civil litigation and mediation.

Armes

Armes

Armes will receive an honorary doctor of business administration.

He was appointed CEO and president of Cooper Tire & Rubber Co. in 2006 and chairman in 2007.

He previously worked in a variety of roles for the Whirlpool Corp. in the areas of engineering, manufacturing, global procurement and international operations management.

Armes served as corporate vice president and general director of Whirlpool Mexico, vice president of manufacturing technology for Whirlpool Asia in Singapore, and vice president of manufacturing technology-refrigeration products for Whirlpool Europe in Italy.

He holds leadership roles on numerous boards, including director of JLG Industries, director of the Manitowoc Co. Inc., director of AGCO Corp., and trustee of the Manufacturer’s Alliance for Productivity and Innovation Inc.

Armes and his wife, Marcia, were instrumental in establishing the Engineering Leadership Institute in UT’s College of Engineering to help undergraduate engineering students gain critical leadership skills. The couple have long supported The University of Toledo through generous gifts to multiple departments.

Other commencement ceremonies taking place are:

• College of Engineering: graduate commencement Thursday, May 7, at 5 p.m.; undergraduate commencement Saturday, May 9, at 3 p.m. Both ceremonies will be held in Nitschke Hall Auditorium.

• College of Nursing: Friday, May 8, at 1 p.m. in Savage Arena.

• College of Law: Saturday, May 9, at 10 a.m. in the Student Union Auditorium.

• College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences: Saturday, May 9, at 10 a.m. in Savage Arena.

• College of Medicine and Life Sciences: Friday, May 29, at 2 p.m. at the Stranahan Theater.

For more information, visit utoledo.edu/commencement.