University modifies admittance practice for some pre-major students | UToledo News

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University modifies admittance practice for some pre-major students

Area guidance counselors have been notified of a new method to admitting some pre-major students that is intended to ensure students with academic need have access to developmental resources upon entering the University.

According to Kevin Kucera, associate vice president for enrollment services, the University will defer admittance of any student with a grade point average (GPA) below 2.0 and an ACT score of less than 19 who applies to UT after July 1 until spring semester.

The change was outlined in a memorandum distributed last week.

“Previously, a direct-from-high-school student choosing to enroll at UT with a grade point average below 2.0 and an ACT score of less than 19 would only be allowed to schedule 11 hours of course work until he or she had completed all required developmental classes,” Kucera said. “While it was the University’s intent to ensure this student population was able to receive the resources they would need to succeed, it inadvertently created some issues for families seeking financial aid, dependent insurance coverage and other important things that are linked to a ‘full-time student’ status.”

He added, “ As a result, we have modified the admittance of our pre-major students in this category. Under the new model, students electing to enroll at UT with a GPA below 2.0 and an ACT score of less than 19 after July 1 will have their admittance deferred until spring semester [January 2010].”

Kucera said this model is fairly common across higher education, particularly at schools with branch campuses where admittance is often deferred from the main campus to the alternative campus until the following semester/quarter.

“By deferring admission for this group, the University can better ensure developmental resources will be available to students who are eager to earn a college degree, but lack some essential pre-college course work,” Kucera said.

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