Director of UT archaeological research program honored for lifetime achievements

August 13, 2012 | News, UToday



Dr. David M. Stothers, longtime University of Toledo professor of anthropology and archaeology, has received a lifetime achievement award from the Archaeological Society of Ohio.

Stothers

“Dr. Stothers knows his archaeology and has taught me and others a lot,” said George DeMuth, president of the Sandusky Bay Chapter of the Archaeological Society of Ohio. “He is one professional that is willing to work with us avocationals, and we respect him for that.”

The Archaeological Society of Ohio, founded in 1941, is the oldest and largest archaeology society in the United States, according to the organization’s website. It represents about 3,000 amateur archaeologists across the country.

Robert Converse, editor of the Ohio Archaeologist, presented Stothers with the lifetime achievement award during the society’s quarterly meeting in May. The plaque states it was given “in tribute and recognition for a lifetime of contributions and dedication to the highest standards of research and publication in the science of archaeology.”

Stothers taught archaeology at UT for 38 years and is the director of the Western Lake Erie Archaeological Research Program based at UT.

He continues to do both research and archaeological projects throughout northwest and north central Ohio. He has been directing work on the parallel ditches and other areas at the Heckleman Archaeological Research Project site near Milan, Ohio, the past five summers.

Stothers also has directed efforts at the Seaman’s Fort and Taylor sites in Erie County the past 20 years. In addition, he has been involved in the Bear Fort, Miller’s Ridge and Petersen archaeological sites.

“Too many professionals overlook the contributions that can be made by avocationals in finding sites in particular and working excavations under professional supervision,” Stothers said. “I couldn’t have accomplished all I’ve done without their cooperation.”