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Toledo to Host Northern Illinois Nov. 13 With Division Title Race on Line

It’s November, and in the world of college football, that means MACtion, and with MACtion comes the annual showdown between Toledo and Northern Illinois.

The Rockets and Huskies will meet in the Glass Bowl Wednesday, Nov. 13, at 8 p.m. The game will be broadcast on ESPN2.

The Rockets enter Wednesday’s home game vs. Northern Illinois a half-game out of first place in the MAC West Division.

In every single season since 2010, Toledo and NIU have met in November with the MAC West title still at stake for one or both schools. Despite the fact that both teams have multiple conference losses this season, this year’s matchup could be a factor in determining the West Division representative to the Mid-American Conference Championship Game Dec. 7.

Toledo (6-3, 3-2 MAC) is still in the thick of the division race. The Rockets are a half-game behind Western Michigan and Central Michigan (both 4-2) and tied with Ball State (3-2). Toledo and CMU meet in the season finale in Mount Pleasant Friday, Nov. 29.

For NIU (3-6, 2-3 MAC), on the other hand, a loss to the Rockets would officially knock them out of the race.

Toledo is coming off two consecutive home wins, most recently a 35-33 thriller over Kent State Nov. 5. Junior Shakif Seymour rushed for a career-high 175 yards and two touchdowns to lead the Rockets. Seymour, taking over as Toledo’s main running option due to a first-half injury to sophomore Bryant Koback, gained 40 yards and two first downs in Toledo’s final possession as the Rockets ran out the clock and held on to the victory.

Northern Illinois is coming off a 48-10 loss at Central Michigan Nov. 2. The Huskies rank third in the MAC in total defense, allowing an average 372.7 yards per game. The offense is led by senior quarterback Ross Bowers, who is second in the MAC with 243.4 yards passing per contest.

Toledo leads, 31-15. NIU beat the Rockets, 38-15, in DeKalb last year.

Full-time UToledo employees and retirees may purchase two tickets at half-price. Additional tickets may be purchased at the full price. UToledo students are admitted to home games free with ID.

To purchase tickets, stop by the UT Athletic Ticket Office, located in the Sullivan Athletic Complex at Savage Arena, go to the Toledo Football Ticket Central website, or call 419.530.GOLD (4653).

UToledo Awarded Federal Grant to Train Teenagers in Cybersecurity

From hackers to cyberbullies, cybercriminals are increasingly targeting technology-hungry teenagers.

To combat the growing problem, the National Science Foundation awarded The University of Toledo College of Engineering a three-year, $267,742 grant to teach local high school students about the risks and threats associated with smartphones, tablets and other technology, as well as provide cybersecurity training to encourage careers in computer science and cybersecurity.

Javaid

“The cybersecurity landscape is changing fast, and due to the ubiquitous information on the internet, the enemies of the state are more dangerous and advanced than ever,” said Dr. Ahmad Javaid, assistant professor in the UToledo Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; director of the Paul A. Hotmer Cybersecurity and Teaming Research Lab; and project leader. “We need to train the future workforce to prepare them for what’s to come and protect the nation.”

The plan calls for a summer camp setting and using interactive, animated visualizations to help students understand cybersecurity threats, defense and prevention mechanisms.

If the project aimed at creating a safer cyber environment is successful locally, the new high school cybersecurity curriculum could be adopted nationwide.

UToledo is collaborating with Purdue University Northwest (PNW) on the research. The National Science Foundation awarded PNW about $230,000, bringing the total funding for the project to nearly half a million dollars.

U.S. Department of Energy Invests $5.7 Million in UToledo Solar Technology Research

The U.S. Department of Energy awarded The University of Toledo $5.7 million for two solar energy technology research projects.

Both projects involve the University collaborating with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and First Solar, one of the world’s largest manufacturers of solar cells and a company that originated in UToledo laboratories.

Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur shook hands with Dr. Yanfa Yan at a Nov. 6 press conference to announce the U.S. Department of Energy awarded The University of Toledo $5.7 million for two solar energy technology research projects.

It’s part of $128 million in grant funding the federal agency announced today it is awarding to 75 research projects across the country to advance solar technologies that will lower solar electricity costs while working to boost solar manufacturing, reduce red tape, and make solar systems more resilient to cyberattacks.

Media are invited to a news conference Wednesday, Nov. 6, at 2:30 p.m. in the UToledo Research and Technology Complex Room 1010. Congresswoman Marcy Kaptur and Dr. Frank Calzonetti, UToledo vice president of research, will speak at the event.

The total federal funding awarded to northern Ohio today is $11 million with the addition of $3 million to Eaton Corp. near Cleveland. Representatives from Eaton are scheduled to attend the news conference at UToledo.

“Advancing global leadership in solar energy technology continues to be a critical focus of the University, and we are proud of the incredible progress and determination of our researchers,” Calzonetti said. “In the last few months alone, nearly $14 million in competitive federal funding has now been awarded to faculty and students working on cutting-edge solar technology in the UToledo Wright Center for Photovoltaics Innovation and Commercialization. Providing a strong research underpinning of our region’s solar energy industry is central to our mission.”

“Investments from the Department of Energy are yielding real results for ensuring a competitive 21st-century solar industry right here in northern Ohio,” Kaptur said. “Today’s competitively awarded grants highlight and support northern Ohio’s important role in the research and development of solar technology. Solar technology will be a monumental part of our economic and clean energy future, not only as a region, but as a nation and as a planet. Innovative institutions, including The University of Toledo and Eaton Corporation, both of which are national leaders in photovoltaics research, are moving the ball forward. As the chair of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, I will continue to prioritize Department of Energy programs that fund these important programs and grant opportunities.”

Building on its more than 30-year history advancing solar technology to power the world using clean energy, UToledo is pushing the performance of solar cells to levels never before reached.

The Department of Energy awarded UToledo $4.5 million to develop the next-generation solar panel by bringing a new, ultra-high efficiency material to the consumer market.

As part of the project, UToledo will work with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and First Solar to develop industrially relevant methods for both the fabrication and performance prediction of low-cost, efficient and stable perovskite thin-film PV modules.

Perovskites are compound materials with a special crystal structure formed through chemistry.

Dr. Yanfa Yan, UToledo professor of physics, Ohio Research Scholar Chair and leader of the project, has had great success in the lab drawing record levels of power from the same amount of sunlight by using two perovskites on top of each other that use two different parts of the sun’s spectrum on very thin, flexible supporting material.

Yan’s efforts have increased the efficiency of the new solar cell to about 23%.

“We are producing higher-efficiency, lower-cost solar cells that show great promise to help solve the world energy crisis,” Yan said. “The meaningful work will help protect our planet for our children and future generations.”

The Department of Energy also announced an award of $3.5 million to Colorado State University to work with UToledo, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, First Solar and the University of Illinois at Chicago on a project to improve the voltage produced by cadmium-telluride-based solar cells. The amount of the award in this project going to The University of Toledo is approximately $1.2 million. UToledo’s leader on this project is Dr. Michael Heben, UToledo professor of physics and McMaster Endowed Chair.

The grants come after the Department of Energy selected UToledo to host National Lab Day, which last month connected students and researchers with preeminent scientists from world-class facilities across the country to explore opportunities for additional partnerships.

This summer the U.S. Air Force awarded UToledo physicists $7.4 million to develop solar technology that is lightweight, flexible, highly efficient and durable in space so it can provide power for space vehicles using sunlight.

The U.S. Department of Energy also recently awarded UToledo physicists $750,000 to improve the production of hydrogen as fuel, using clean energy — solar power — to split the water molecule and create clean energy — hydrogen fuel.

UToledo to Honor Veterans Nov. 11

The 15th annual Veterans Appreciation Breakfast and Resource Fair will take place Monday, Nov. 11, at 8 a.m. in Savage Arena at The University of Toledo.

UToledo teams up with the American Red Cross and the Lucas County Veterans Service Commission to pay tribute to area veterans and active service members for the sacrifices they have made for their country.

Dr. Mike Toole, dean of the UToledo College of Engineering, will speak at the event on behalf of the University.

“It is an honor and a privilege to be able to thank the men and women who have served and are serving the United States in the armed forces,” Toole said. “This event is a way for our community members to come together to express gratitude and show respect to these dedicated individuals.”

Wishard

First Sgt. Nathan Wishard of the U.S. Army will give the keynote address.

A native of York, Penn., Wishard enlisted in the Army in 2003. He attended basic training at Fort Jackson, S.C., and completed advanced individual training in the military occupational specialty of Apache helicopter armament/electrical/avionic systems repair at Fort Eustis, Va.

Wishard’s deployments include Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, where he served with the 82nd Combat Aviation Brigade, Attach Reconnaissance Battalion, Wolfpack. Currently, he is serving in the Toledo Recruiting Company within the Cleveland Battalion.

His awards and decorations include a Meritorious Service Medal 2nd Oak Leaf Cluster, Army Commendation Medal 5th Oak Leaf Cluster, Army Achievement Medal 17th Oak Leaf Cluster, Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal and Good Conduct Medal 3rd Knot.

In addition to the free breakfast, local veterans and members of the military and their families will have access to more than 30 military-friendly community resources.

The program also will feature entertainment by the UToledo Jazz Ensemble and fourth-graders from Waterville Primary School, as well as a historical military vehicle display.

Members of the Rossford High School S.O.S. (Serving Our Soldiers) Club will greet and assist veterans through the breakfast line.

Free parking will be available in lots 3, 5 and 6 near Savage Arena.

For more information on the event, contact the UToledo Office of Special Events at 419.530.2200 or specialevents@utoledo.edu.

Toledo Beats Kent State, 35-33

Junior Shakif Seymour rushed for a career-high 175 yards and two touchdowns to lead Toledo to a hard-fought 35-33 triumph over Kent State Tuesday night in the Glass Bowl.

Seymour, taking over as the Rockets’ main running option due to a first-half injury to sophomore Bryant Koback, gained 40 yards and two first downs in Toledo’s final possession as the Rockets ran out the clock and held on to the victory.

Shakif Seymour ran for 175 yards and two touchdowns in Toledo’s 35-33 win over Kent State.

With the win, Toledo (6-3, 3-2 Mid-American Conference) gained bowl eligibility, but, more importantly, stayed in the hunt in the MAC West Division. The Rockets are a half-game behind Western Michigan and Central Michigan (4-2) and tied with Ball State (3-2).

“Conference wins are tough to get in November,” said Head Coach Jason Candle. “Everybody wants to be playing meaningful games in November and that’s where we’re at. We played a much-improved team tonight and it was a gritty performance from our guys. I’m really proud of their effort.

The Rocket defense made it difficult for Kent State quarterback Dustin Crum.

“We have a very young football team, and it can be really hard to predict what’s going to happen. I trust the leadership and makeup of our players, we recruit guys who are winners. Pride is a tough thing, it can be a slippery slope. It can bite you or it can propel you to some great things. Our guys have responded the last couple weeks, and they’ve gotten a couple tough wins.”

Toledo held a 28-17 advantage at halftime, but saw the lead go down to one, 28-27, when the Golden Flashes scored late in the third quarter.

Seymour scored his second touchdown of the game to put Toledo up, 35-27, with 11:49 left. But Kent State responded with a 15-play, 70-yard drive that culminated with a five-yard TD pass from QB Dustin Crum to Keenan Orr on fourth down. Trailing by two, 35-33, the Flashes went for two, and Crum came up inches short on the rushing attempt.

Toledo never let KSU have another chance to score by controlling the ball for the remainder of the game.

Toledo’s offense racked up 483 yards of total offense, including 289 yards on the ground. Junior Eli Peters led the passing game, completing 15 of 25 passes for 194 yards and one score.

The defense was led by senior linebacker Jordan Fisher (11 tackles, 1.5 tackles for loss) and sophomore defensive end Jamal Hines (six tackles, 2.5 tackles for loss).

Up next, the Rockets host Northern Illinois on Senior Night Wednesday, Nov. 13, in the Glass Bowl.

Report Examines State Progress in Implementing Great Lakes Compact

The University of Toledo College of Law’s Legal Institute of the Great Lakes released a new report assessing the progress each of the eight Great Lakes states has made in implementing the terms of the 2008 interstate compact that ushered in a new era of water management and conservation in the Great Lakes region.

While the overall assessment is positive, the report identifies critical areas for improvement within each state.

Ken Kilbert, UToledo professor of law and director of the Legal Institute of the Great Lakes, is the principal author of the white paper titled An Assessment of the Great Lakes States’ Implementation of the Water Management and Conservation Provisions of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact.” The report provides a state-by-state assessment of how Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin are carrying out the water management, conservation and efficiency provisions of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact.

Forrest Miller, a third-year UToledo law student, and Aubrey Merkle, a second-year UToledo law student, are co-authors of the white paper. This project afforded them the opportunity to enhance their substantive knowledge of water law and related fields, as well as their legal research, writing and analytical skills.

The report is particularly timely. This December, each state is required to report on its implementation of water management, conservation and efficiency programs under the compact. The states’ reports are subject to review by the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Council, which will determine whether state programs meet compact provisions and will make recommendations to those that do not.

“The compact not only banned most new diversions of water outside the Great Lakes basin, it also required the states to undertake stronger programs for management and conservation of waters within the basin,” Kilbert said. “In order to fulfill the promise of the compact, it is essential that the states carry out their obligations to implement its terms.”

The Legal Institute of the Great Lakes is a multidisciplinary research center within the College of Law. The research project was funded by a grant from the Joyce Foundation.

Kilbert joined UToledo College of Law faculty in 2006. He teaches environmental law, natural resources law, administrative law, civil procedure and water law. As director of the institute, Kilbert organizes the annual Great Lakes Water Conference, which this year is scheduled for Friday, Nov. 8.

President Recognized by Alma Mater

The University of Toledo President Sharon L. Gaber has been recognized by the University of Southern California as a pioneering academic leader.

Gaber, who received a master of urban planning degree from USC, was named one of the “90 Pioneers” who as alumni demonstrate the strong history, impact and relevance of the USC Sol Price School of Public Policy. The recognition is part of the school’s celebration of its 90th anniversary throughout 2019.

Gaber

Gaber was honored as the first woman to serve as president of The University of Toledo, beginning her tenure in 2015. Her alma mater also noted her academic career with a background in city and regional planning, and previous roles as provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of Arkansas and interim provost at Auburn University.

USC also noted Gaber’s recognition by Education Dive last year when she was named one of the top higher education leaders to watch in 2018 and beyond.

To learn more about the recognition, visit the USC Price 90 Years of Pioneers website.

UTMC to Host Educational Program on CryoMAZE, Other Treatments for Atrial Fibrillation

The University of Toledo Medical Center now offers an innovative, minimally invasive surgical treatment for patients with atrial fibrillation, eliminating the need to continue on blood thinners.

The procedure, called CryoMAZE, uses precision application of extreme cold inside the heart, establishing a barrier that prevents stray electrical signals from causing the heart to beat irregularly.

“The goal of this procedure is to kill the cells without damaging the walls of the heart. This is why this procedure does not accidentally make a hole in the heart which can happen with heat-based procedures. If the cells are dead, they cannot conduct electricity. That makes a fence so the electrical impulses don’t spill over into the rest of atrium. It’s like putting insulation on a wire — you are letting electrical impulse to go through only in the normal path without spreading around randomly,” said Dr. Saqib Masroor, chief of the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery at UTMC.

Masroor will give a free, educational presentation on atrial fibrillation and the latest treatment options, including minimally invasive CryoMAZE, Thursday, Nov. 7, at 6:30 p.m. in the Center for Creative Education on Health Science Campus.

For more information or to register for the event, call 419.383.6939.

Atrial fibrillation, or AFib, is the most common type of heart arrhythmia in the United States; it affects between 2.7 million and 6.1 million Americans.

In AFib, the heart’s upper chambers, or atria, don’t beat in coordination with the heart’s lower chambers or ventricles. That can lead to pooling of the blood and clotting in the atria, creating an increased risk of congestive heart failure and stroke.

Blood thinners are commonly used to reduce the risk of stroke in AFib patients, but they can increase the risk of bleeding. Other options for treating AFib require open-heart surgery or the use of catheters threaded through major arteries in either the groin or neck to get to the heart.

In the minimally invasive CryoMAZE procedure, a surgeon makes a small incision in the right side of the chest. Through that, they’re able to access the outside of the heart and create scar tissue with the specialized probe that is cooled to approximately -60 degrees Celsius. A surgeon also can put a clip on the left atrial through the same incision.

The recovery time in the hospital is typically three to five days.

Masroor said success rates for CryoMAZE are approximately 90%. An added benefit of using cold rather than heat to create scar tissue is that there isn’t a risk of putting a hole in the heart.

“Many people don’t know their options beyond blood thinners,” Masroor said. “We want to educate people that there are many safe options that will prevent them from having to take blood thinners and have complications from atrial fibrillation.”

Lake Erie Bill of Rights Topic of Great Lakes Water Conference Nov. 8 at UToledo

Toledo’s innovative Lake Erie Bill of Rights will take center stage with a family of “forever chemicals” during the 19th annual Great Lakes Water Conference at The University of Toledo College of Law.

Approved by voters in February and challenged by a lawsuit in federal court, the new “rights of nature” ordinance that allows citizens to sue on behalf of the lake to address pollution has attracted national and international attention.

The UToledo Lake Erie Center research vessel helps to monitor the lake’s water quality.

The conference, which is sponsored by the College of Law and its Legal Institute of the Great Lakes, will take place Friday, Nov. 8, from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Law Center McQuade Auditorium.

“Three panels of experts will be tackling issues of local, regional, national and international import,” said Ken Kilbert, UToledo professor of law and director of the Legal Institute of the Great Lakes. “Law and policy are key to the solutions.”

The keynote speaker will be Carrie Sowden, archaeological director of the National Museum of the Great Lakes. She will talk at 8:45 a.m.

The first panel, which will debate the city of Toledo’s Lake Erie Bill of Rights, will start at 9:15 a.m. Kilbert will serve as moderator with speakers Jason Hill, court administrator for the Ohio Sixth District Court of Appeals, who teaches election law; Terry Lodge, a Toledo attorney who specializes in environmental and energy issues and supports the ordinance; and Louis Tosi, attorney with Shumaker, Loop & Kendrick in Toledo, who serves as chair of the firm’s Environmental Practice Group.

The other two panels will explore water quality problems posed by PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) chemicals, a proposed rule affecting the reach of the federal Clean Water Act, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine’s the new H2Ohio initiative, and a proposed new diversion of Great Lakes water.

The one-day conference is free and open to the public. Registration is $75 for attorneys seeking 4.5 hours of Ohio Continuing Legal Education credit.

For more information about the conference and to register for credit or box lunch, visit the College of Law website.

UToledo Pre-Health Advising Center Offers Enhanced Support for Students Pursuing Healthcare Careers

The University of Toledo is celebrating the opening of a specialized undergraduate advising center to support students in UToledo’s growing pre-professional and allied health programs.

A ribbon-cutting ceremony to dedicate the new Pre-Health Advising Center will take place Thursday, Nov. 7, at 9 a.m. outside University Hall Room 2160. The Nursing Advising Center, relocated across the hall, also will be recognized.

Deborah Hendricks, director of the Pre-Health Advising Center, left, and Shavron Kelley, program coordinator at the Pre-Health Advising Center, are on campus to assist students interested in pre-professional and allied health programs.

The new Pre-Health Advising Center brings together a comprehensive array of services for students interested in pursuing a career in healthcare.

Academic advisers will be available to help students who have declared a pre-med/pre-vet/pre-dental concentration with course selection, provide information about clinical and networking opportunities, and offer guidance on navigating the application process to medical school and other professional healthcare programs.

“We know that jobs in healthcare are growing. As part of our commitment to student success, we want to ensure our students are on track and well-prepared to enter those career fields,” said Dr. Amy Thompson, vice provost for faculty affairs and professor of public health. “This center provides specialized resources to support and encourage students, as well as help them review their options at UToledo.”

UToledo boasts an extensive catalog of options for undergraduate students pursuing a career in healthcare; these include a number of pre-medicine tracks, pre-physical therapy, pre-dental, pre-veterinary and pre-pharmacy.

The Pre-Health Advising Center is open to all undergraduates enrolled in a healthcare program. Staff at the center also can provide guidance to those considering attending UToledo or who are undecided on a major explore the University’s numerous pre-professional and allied health fields.

“We want our students to find the right home for their interests and talents,” Thompson said. “Our advisers can walk students through academic prerequisites and help them evaluate all possible majors that are in the health professions so that they find the best fit.”

The center also has special workshops for pre-medicine, pre-dental and pre-veterinary students, as well as students enrolled in UToledo’s Bacc2MD Program and the UToledo/Case Western Reserve University’s School of Dental Medicine Program.