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Family Nurse Practitioner Students Holding Virtual Book Drive

Everyone remembers that cherished childhood book.

“My favorite was ‘Go, Dog. Go!’ by P.D. Eastman,” said Cassi Laberdee, a student in the Family Nurse Practitioner Program. “Reading and being read to beginning at a young age can shape children in such a positive way; it can pave the way for a knowledge-filled life. And this allows parents and children another way to bond and grow their relationships.”

Jessica Asher, a student in the Family Nurse Practitioner Program, read “Bedtime Bear” to her 3-month-old twins, Jasey, left, and Jozey.

“I loved Dr. Seuss’ ABC book when I was a kid. It helped me to learn my alphabet in a fun way growing up. I always loved learning and reading,” said Stephanie Zecman, who also is in the Family Nurse Practitioner Program.

Laberdee and Zecman are teaming up with a couple peers to hold the family nurse practitioner students’ spring project — a virtual book drive that runs through Monday, April 20.

The drive is being conducted through Books By the Bushel, and donations will go to Reach Out and Read, a grant-funded program in the UToledo Department of Pediatrics.

“Our goal is to give 500 books to Reach and Read; that’s the equivalent of $1,000 — $2 a book,” Laberdee said.

Reach Out and Read prepares America’s youngest children to succeed in school by partnering with doctors to prescribe books and encourage families to read together.

Doctors, nurse practitioners and other medical professionals incorporate Reach Out and Read’s evidence-based model into regular pediatric checkups by advising parents about the importance of reading aloud and giving developmentally appropriate books to children.

Locally, the program reaches 15,000 families with young children at 24 pediatric and family practice offices in northwest Ohio. The program distributes 30,000 new books a year.

Nationally, Reach Out and Read programs are located in 6,400 hospitals, health centers and pediatric clinics in all 50 states. The program also serves 4.8 million children and families each year. More than 7.4 million new, developmentally appropriate books are given to children annually.

“I think the book drive is important during this unfortunate time because it allows one to look forward to something and gives people the option to donate to a good cause,” Jessica Asher, family nurse practitioner student, said. “With these hard times in mind, it will help these kids to feel loved and have something to look forward to at their well visits.”

Asher’s favorite book as a child was “Kittens and More Kittens” by Marci Ridlon. These days, she reads “Dragons Love Tacos” by Adam Rubin to her twin girls.

“We hope to gather donations to give children the gift of reading and new memorable books to take home,” Asher said.

“Doing this virtual book drive through the Reach Out and Read Program, especially during these challenging times, can give people some positivity that they are helping children in need,” Allison Locke, a family nurse practitioner student, said. “Knowing we can help provide books to children through their pediatric care offices brings me so much joy.”

Zecman worked in a pediatric clinical site last semester and saw the program in action.

“Passing out books to all of my pediatrics patients was a great feeling. They would get so excited to get a book, even after they may have had to get poked for blood, they walked out smiling with a book in hand,” Zecman said. “It is especially important during these hard times where kids may not be getting hands-on education every day at school; having a book collection would be so beneficial for the kids that need it the most.”

Donations to the virtual book drive may be made on the Books By the Bushel website.

For more information on the drive, email cassi.laberdee@rockets.utoledo.edu.

UToledo, Owens Launch New Nursing Education Partnership

A dual-admission agreement between The University of Toledo and Owens Community College provides a new approach for educating the next generation of nurses.

The new partnership — the first of its kind in northwest Ohio — allows students to jointly apply for admission to the nursing programs at both Owens and UToledo, establishing a seamless pathway for students to earn an associate in applied science degree in registered nursing from Owens followed by a bachelor of science degree in nursing from UToledo while having access to all the benefits of both institutions.

UToledo President Sharon L. Gaber shook hands with Owens Community College President Steve Robinson after signing a dual-admission agreement for nursing programs at both institutions. Dr. Catherine Ford, dean of the Owens School of Nursing and Health Professions, left, and Dr. Linda Lewandowski, dean of the UToledo College of Nursing, were on hand for the ceremony.

“This is a wonderful way to strengthen our relationship with Owens and provide even more opportunities for students in our region, ensuring their success in the workplace,” UToledo President Sharon L. Gaber said. “Having a baccalaureate degree increases opportunities for nurses, and it is important that we establish these types of partnerships to ensure individuals in our community have the strong educational foundation they need for a successful nursing career.”

“Creating pathways for student success is an important part of Owens’ strategic plan, and we are excited for what this dual enrollment agreement with The University of Toledo means for our nursing students,” said Owens Community College President Steve Robinson. “This seamless pathway from an associate to bachelor’s degree will help remove another barrier to student success, and we are proud to partner with The University of Toledo to make that happen.”

The agreement was signed during a ceremony at Owens March 5. The program is expected to enroll its first students this summer.

The new dual-admission program is designed to give students a sense of belonging at both institutions, while providing unique opportunities and support throughout their education.

Advisers from both Owens and UToledo will work with students from the start to ensure they are taking the courses needed to complete both degrees.

As students enrolled at both Owens and UToledo, individuals can receive free tickets to UToledo sporting events, access to UToledo libraries, and participate in programs and activities sponsored by the UToledo Office of Student Involvement and Leadership — all while working toward their associate’s degree at Owens. Students also have the option to take electives and general education courses at UToledo.

Upon completion of their associate’s degree from Owens, students have a guaranteed spot in the UToledo College of Nursing’s online R.N. to B.S.N. program, with no additional application or admission fee.

While a B.S.N. isn’t necessary for licensure, recent surveys from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing have found that more than 80% of employers strongly prefer job candidates with a bachelor’s degree.

The percentage of employers who require new hires to have a bachelor’s degree also has risen sharply in recent years, from 30% in 2011 to 43% in 2019.

“We are thrilled about the nursing program dual admission and enrollment agreement with The University of Toledo,” said Dr. Catherine Ford, dean of the Owens School of Nursing and Health Professions. “Owens nursing students will now be able to complete the associate in applied science degree at Owens while dual-enrolled at UToledo. This allows students to purposefully prepare for transition to UToledo to complete the R.N. to B.S.N. program. The need for registered nurses continues to be very strong in northwest Ohio and nationwide, making these types of collaborations especially important for students entering the profession.”

“There is a growing body of evidence that indicates having a baccalaureate degree makes a difference in terms of patient outcomes, patient safety and quality of care,” said Dr. Linda Lewandowski, dean of the UToledo College of Nursing. “The additional education students receive in a B.S.N. program adds skills in evidence-based practice, quality improvement, care coordination, critical thinking and problem solving, all of which are vital in today’s complex healthcare environments.”

UToledo’s R.N. to B.S.N. program can be done through a traditional online curriculum or through the University’s first-in-the-state Competency-Based Education Program, which provides students unique flexibility to pursue a B.S.N. at their own personalized pace.

UToledo Mental Health Experts Offer Tips to Cope With Coronavirus

As the spread of COVID-19 continues to widen, mental health experts at The University of Toledo say it’s natural for people to feel nervous — but it’s important not to let that fear take over your life.

“With all of the focus on this situation, it is easy to feel threatened and vulnerable,” said Dr. Linda Lewandowski, dean of the UToledo College of Nursing and a clinical psychologist, who has extensive experience in trauma research and disaster mental health. “One of the most important things we need to do to cope with the concern or anxiety all of this might engender is to keep things in perspective and not inflate the risk.”

Unquestionably, the outbreak represents a major public health challenge. On March 11, the World Health Organization officially recognized COVID-19 as a global pandemic, and many states — including Ohio — have issued states of emergency.

While the threat of COVID-19 is real and greater than illnesses such as seasonal influenza, experts say it is important to keep things in perspective. The majority of individuals worldwide who have been confirmed to have the illness suffer from minor symptoms. The World Health Organization says about 80% of cases recover without needing any special treatment.

Experts also say it is important people remember actions being taken by governments and public health officials aren’t being done out of panic, but out of a medically sound strategy to reduce our collective risk.

Here are some additional suggestions from UToledo mental health experts:

Get factual information and take realistic precautions.

Avoid social media in favor of information from reputable sources such as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, the World Health Organization and your local health department.

Reputable sources have consistent recommendations, including frequent hand washing, staying home if you’re sick, and not wearing a mask if you are healthy.

“It is completely understandable for those individuals at high risk, those with chronic medical conditions, or older adults to experience more anxiety and/or worry,” said Dr. Jason Levine, associate professor in the UToledo Department of Psychology. “Anxiety in many instances is an adaptive response to threat. It can be motivating and protective. However, overwhelming anxiety can be stifling and cause significant disruption in one’s daily life and functioning.”

Avoid an overdose of media.

Focusing too much on minute-to-minute reporting of the situation can have a negative effect and can increase your feelings of immediate threat and vulnerability. Staying informed is important, but obsessing over media coverage can trigger your fight or flight response to a threat when the actual threat is relatively low.

“Constantly watching TV or reading news reports about the COVID-19 virus can scare you into believing that you need to worry about the virus constantly, right now, this very minute,” Lewandowski said. “Knowing the real facts from reputable sources is important for us to take realistic precautions. Relying only on information from Facebook or other social media platforms is never a good idea. Misinformation abounds on these sites.”

During the Iraq War in 2008, Lewandowski was part of a research team that found that the more people watched the news about the war, the more anxious they felt, and the more mental health symptoms they reported.

Work to keep yourself mentally healthy as well as physically healthy.

Mental health experts say anxiety has a biological purpose, with those feelings helping to push us to take steps to prepare and protect ourselves.

Experts suggest thinking about ways you have dealt with anxiety in the past and being open to exploring new strategies. For example, you might talk to a friend or family member, use mindfulness or meditation, read a book, watch an uplifting movie, or get some exercise.

“Try to develop a new routine and not fall into unhealthy practices like binge eating or drinking more,” said Dr. Cheryl McCullumsmith, professor and chair of the UToledo Department of Psychiatry. “Eating healthy, engaging in exercise, getting enough sleep, and maybe trying some new relaxation apps on your phone are ways you can stay physically and mentally healthy.”

Have and be a support network.

It’s important to maintain contact with family, friends and co-workers. Reach out. Keep in touch with and check on people who are particularly at risk or isolated and alone to help them stay connected and supported. Using FaceTime or other video-chatting apps may help to decrease feelings of isolation.

With disruptions in schedules, cancellations and other social distancing measures, it can be easy to fall at loose ends. Besides keeping up with your schoolwork or working from home on your job, figure out how you can use this time as an opportunity to do things you might not have had time for in a normal course of events.

Get help if you need it.

While some anxiety and nervousness are natural, mental health experts say if you find yourself panicked or if your fear about the situation is enough that it begins interfering with daily responsibilities and functioning, it would be wise to consider a consultation with a primary care or behavioral health provider.

“It can be helpful just to have someone to talk to about our concerns and anxieties. Some people who have a history of mental health issues or who are already feeling overwhelmed by life challenges may find their anxiety or depression heightened during a stressful period such as this,” McCullumsmith said.

UToledo to Host Forum With University Experts Addressing Coronavirus

The University of Toledo will host a public forum featuring health experts to address the latest information on the novel coronavirus, now known as COVID-19.

The forum, Protecting Health: Addressing the Spread of the Novel Coronavirus,” will be held from 3 to 4:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 4, in Collier Building Room 1000A on the UToledo Health Science Campus.

A panel of UToledo faculty experts will address the causes of the disease and how it spreads, ways to avoid exposure to infectious diseases, and efforts underway to respond to the outbreak. The discussion will be moderated by Dr. Joan Duggan, an infectious disease specialist and professor of medicine in the UToledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences.

UToledo experts on the panel will include:

• Dr. Jennifer Hanrahan, associate professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Infectious Disease;

• Dr. Jason Huntley, associate professor of medical microbiology and immunology;

• Dr. Linda Lewandowski, professor and dean of the College of Nursing; and

• Dr. R. Travis Taylor, assistant professor of medical microbiology and immunology.

The panel discussion will be followed by a question-and-answer session with guests in attendance.

The free event is sponsored by the UToledo Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

For those unable to make it to campus, the forum will be streamed live at utoledo.edu/video.

UToledo Sorority to Promote Reading With Book Giveaway Feb. 29

The Toledo Area Alumnae Club of Pi Beta Phi Fraternity for Women will host one of six book giveaways in the country to promote reading and literacy this weekend.

UToledo Pi Beta Phi sorority members will distribute 20,000 books to local children and schools Saturday, Feb. 29, from 9:30 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. in the Thompson Student Union Ingman Room.

The fraternity day of service is made possible thanks to First Book, a nonprofit with a mission to provide books to children from low-income families.

“Only six cities in the United States host fraternity day of service, and we are just so unbelievably honored to be one of the cities,” Natalie Baxter, UToledo junior majoring in nursing and Pi Beta Phi president, said.

More than 150 volunteers from campus and the community will help distribute the books, which are suitable for children and teens.

“Pi Beta Phi believes that reading is a gateway to all of the many opportunities that are offered in the world. Reading takes you places, transforms you, and makes you feel empowered,” Baxter said. “Pi Beta Phi believes that when there is one child that can’t read, that is one child too many. If we just show one child all the amazing things reading has to offer, we have done what we have set out to do.”

Reception for Health Science Campus Artist Showcase Set for Feb. 21

The 15th annual Health Science Campus Artist Showcase will take place from Monday, Feb. 17, through Wednesday, April 8, on the fourth floor of Mulford Library.

This year’s exhibit features work from more than 30 artists who are students, faculty and staff in the health sciences from Health Science and Main campuses, as well as The University of Toledo Medical Center.

Woodson

On display will be a variety of 2-D and 3-D artwork, including paintings, drawings, photography, sculpture and mixed media.

An artist reception will be held Friday, Feb. 21, from 4 to 6 p.m. on the fourth floor of Mulford Library. Dr. Donna Woodson, professor emerita of medicine, will give a talk, “Art is Good for Your Health,” at 4:30 p.m.

Woodson teaches the elective course Art and Medicine: Using Visual Literacy to Improve Diagnostic Skills in the College of Medicine and Life Sciences. She is a longstanding participant in the Health Science Campus Artist Showcase; three of her pieces will be featured in this year’s exhibit.

Light refreshments will be served at the reception, where attendees will have the chance to win books on art and medicine.

Visitors can view the artwork during regular library hours: Monday through Thursday from 7:30 a.m. to midnight; Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.; and Sunday from 9 a.m. to midnight.

For more information on the free, public exhibit and reception, visit the University Libraries’ website or contact Jodi Jameson, assistant professor and nursing librarian at Mulford Library, and member of the artist showcase committee, at 419.383.5152 or jodi.jameson@utoledo.edu.

Associate Dean Co-Authors Textbook to Encourage More Scholarly Writing Among Nurses

At one of Dr. Robert Topp’s previous institutions, nearly one in five patients scheduled for a cardiac catherization canceled the appointment on the day of the procedure. Frequently, it was because the patient hadn’t completed the necessary blood work or hadn’t followed the proper preparation guidelines.

Administrators were prepared to cut staffing by 20% to offset the lower patient volume.

Instead, a group of clinical nursing staff developed a plan to call patients the night before to go through a checklist of everything that needed done and be at the ready to provide pre-written orders for any last-minute requirements.

Topp, now a professor and associate dean for research and scholarship at The University of Toledo College of Nursing, said that solution cut the cancelation rate from approximately 20% to 3%, saving the center almost $500,000 a year.

“It really generated a lot of positive public relations ink for the nurses in the department. Their problem was, this plan to manage patients was never published,” he said. “This great thing the nurses developed to save money and help patients was only communicated within the institution, when it could have had a wider impact.”

Topp wants to encourage UToledo’s nursing students, clinical staff and faculty to think about how they might be able to impact healthcare delivery through scholarly writing.

He recently collaborated with a colleague from the University of Cincinnati on a new textbook called “Pain-Free Writing for Nurses: A Step-by-Step Approach.”

Topp

“Nurses have a wealth of knowledge. This book explains how to get that knowledge in a place that other people can use it,” Topp said.

Available in both printed and online form from the Springer Publishing Co., the book provides a start-to-finish guide for scholarly writing and illustrative anecdotes like the one from the cath center.

The book also dispels myths about writing, including the idea that you need a doctoral degree to be published.

“Students and clinical nurses are first authors on many manuscripts I co-author because they make a significant contribution to the work. Co-authoring with students helps them to understand that their work can have a broader impact on improving healthcare,” Topp said. “As students consider enrolling in the College of Nursing, one of the advantages here at UToledo is that they have the opportunity to work with faculty to publish a manuscript, which is a tangible deliverable of their academic experience.”

Topp said scholarly writing for nurses isn’t different from what microbiologists or chemists produce, it’s just that many nurses aren’t introduced to the concept. By providing the guidelines for that process, students and clinical nurses are more prepared to make meaningful contributions to healthcare as future nursing leaders.

“Nursing is a clinical science. The interventions nurses develop can have an immediate impact on healthcare delivery and the cost of care,” he said. “That’s one of the advantages for students and clinical nurses to learn how to write scholarly articles.”

UToledo Offers New Pathway to Earn Nursing Degree

The University of Toledo College of Nursing will offer guaranteed admission for freshmen into its competitive Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program for select, well-prepared applicants starting fall 2020.

“Nursing is a competitive field, but we feel strongly that by offering a commitment to entering freshman students whose academic achievements show they are uniquely prepared, we can add depth to a highly skilled, compassionate workforce that will meet the needs of northwest Ohio and beyond,” said Dr. Linda Lewandowski, dean of the College of Nursing.

Beginning fall 2020, applicants with a high school GPA of 3.7 or higher and an ACT score of at least 24 will be directly enrolled in UToledo’s B.S.N. Program.

Previously, all applicants pursuing a B.S.N. were first enrolled in UToledo’s Pre-Nursing Program with a requirement that they officially apply in their sophomore year to get into the nursing major to complete their degree. Applicants who do not meet the initial guarantee criteria will still have an opportunity to be admitted into nursing via this current pathway.

“By expanding pathways and opportunities for prospective students into our nursing program, we’re responding to the changing needs of students and the healthcare environment,” said Jim Anderson, vice president for enrollment management.

The College of Nursing’s application process also considers a range of personal attributes, such as community service and leadership skills, participation in extracurricular activities, and demonstrated responsibility. Consideration also will be given to those with military experience, first-generation college students, and those who would contribute to the cultural, gender, age, economic, racial or geographic diversity of the healthcare workforce.

The nursing field is expected to be one of the nation’s fastest growing occupations during the next decade as America’s population grows older and current nurses leave the workforce. The Bureau of Labor Statistics has projected there will be more than 370,000 new nursing jobs added between 2018 and 2028.

“Many parts of the country, including northwest Ohio, are experiencing nursing shortages. We are rising to meet that challenge with well-educated, well-trained and compassionate nurses,” Lewandowski said. “Our new admission process, which includes a path to guaranteed admission, is just part of our overall strategy.”

This fall, the College of Nursing experienced a 10% increase in enrollment with the largest cohort of students pursuing a bachelor’s degree in nursing and also recently received full 10-year accreditation from the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education with a positive review of all of the college’s programs. The college also recently launched the state’s first R.N. to B.S.N. online Competency-Based Education Program, which provides unique flexibility to working nurses to advance their careers at their own personalized pace.

UToledo’s Master’s and Doctoral Nursing programs also have been recognized among the best in the nation, with the master’s program jumping 48 spots to No. 135 in the most recent U.S. News & World Report Best Graduate Schools rankings. The Doctor of Nursing Program is ranked 135, up 17 spots from the previous year.

Submissions Sought for 2020 Health Science Campus Artist Showcase

Mulford Library is seeking submissions for its 15th Annual Health Science Campus Artist Showcase.

The deadline to apply for consideration to be included in the exhibition is Friday, Jan. 10.

The library is accepting submissions from UToledo faculty, staff and students in the health sciences — nursing, medicine, pharmacy and the health professions — as well as hospital employees.

To be considered for the show, digital images of artwork can be sent to hscartshow@utoledo.edu, along with a submission form that can be found with guidelines on the Health Science Campus Artist Showcase website.

In the past, the showcase has featured artwork in a variety of media, including photography, painting, drawing, sculpture, jewelry, quilting, multimedia, graphics, wood carving and more.

Artists will be notified by email if their work is accepted into the show by Wednesday, Jan. 15.

The showcase will be on display from Feb. 17 through April 8 on the fourth floor of Mulford Library.

Questions about the exhibit can be directed to Jodi Jameson, assistant professor and nursing librarian at Mulford Library, who is a member of the artist showcase committee, at 419.383.5152 or jodi.jameson@utoledo.edu.

Families Set to Celebrate Commencement Dec. 14

More than 2,000 students at The University of Toledo will graduate at commencement ceremonies Saturday, Dec. 14, in Savage Arena.

The University is holding two ceremonies to include both undergraduate and graduate students from each of the colleges.

A total of 2,070 degrees will be awarded: 1,474 bachelor’s degrees, 426 master’s degrees, 104 doctoral degrees, 41 associate’s degrees, 15 education specialist degrees and 10 graduate certificates.

The 9 a.m. ceremony will recognize all Ph.D. candidates and graduates from the colleges of Arts and Letters; Engineering; Judith Herb College of Education; Natural Sciences and Mathematics; and Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

The 1 p.m. ceremony will recognize undergraduate and graduate students receiving degrees from the colleges of Business and Innovation; Health and Human Services; Nursing; University College; and Medicine and Life Sciences.

Commencement is always a time to celebrate with family. Their support is critical to achieving success. For several students walking across the stage this year, family was literally at their side for the journey.

Lori and Jordan Boyer in 2001 and 2019

At 48 years old, Lori Boyer is set to take the stage and grasp her diploma on the same day as her son, Jordan.

Lori, a preschool teacher, started taking classes at UToledo in 1990, but stopped to raise her three children.

After returning in January to cross the finish line, the UToledo employee at the Early Learning Center is graduating from University College with a bachelor’s degree in an individualized program of early childhood education and educational leadership. Her son is graduating from the College of Engineering with a bachelor’s degree in computer science and engineering technology.

“I am proud to share this special moment with my oldest son,” Boyer said. “It’s important to me to prove to all of my children that you can accomplish anything no matter what point you are in life. I accomplished something I set out to do a long time ago, and it has the potential to take me in different directions in my career.”

Fall commencement also is a family affair for a brother-and-sister duo who worked side by side as undergraduates in the same exercise biology research lab.

Nicole and Dylan Sarieh

Dylan and Nicole Sarieh, two-thirds of a set of fraternal triplets, both chose to study exercise science as pre-med students in the College of Health and Human Services, while their brother studies business at UToledo.

Together, Dylan and Nicole researched the molecular regulation of skeletal muscle growth under the guidance of Dr. Thomas McLoughlin, associate professor in the School of Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, in order to help clinicians develop ways to help patients grow stronger after suffering from muscle loss.

“The opportunity to do real, meaningful, hands-on work in the lab definitely built our confidence and opened our eyes to what is important,” Dylan said about his undergraduate research experience. “My sister and I both plan to next go to medical school. She wants to be a dermatologist, and I want to be a general physician.”

“Whether at home, in the classroom or in the lab, I always had someone I could lean on who was tackling the same challenges,” Nicole said. “Putting our two brains together — even during car rides — made a big difference in our success.”

For some graduates, they found love and are starting their own family.

McKenna Wirebaugh completed a co-op at the BP Whiting Refinery in Whiting, Ind. This photo shows Lake Michigan and the Chicago skyline.

McKenna Wirebaugh, who is graduating with a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering, met her soon-to-be husband at UToledo. Both she and Travis Mang, her fiancé, will receive degrees Saturday.

Turns out, planning their upcoming wedding is the only item left on the to-do list. Wirebaugh secured a full-time job as a process engineer at BP’s Cherry Point Refinery in Blaine, Wash., located about 40 minutes south of Vancouver. She is scheduled to start her new job in March, about a month after her honeymoon.

“I chose to go to UToledo because of the mandatory co-op program in engineering,” Wirebaugh said. “It guaranteed I would have a paycheck while in school and build my resumé. I’m grateful for my decision because it ended up launching my career.”

Wirebaugh completed four co-op rotations with BP while at UToledo. She also helped build a water purification unit that was sent to Ecuador through the nonprofit organization Clean Water for the World.

Her favorite experience as a student in the Jesup Scott Honors College was a class focusing on creativity. For a group project on the dangers of cell-phone use, they brought in a PlayStation 2 system and challenged students to text and drive on Mario Kart without crashing.

“My professors have truly cared about me inside and outside of my academic career,” Wirebaugh said. “I don’t see the friendships I’ve made here ending anytime soon.”

In the event of inclement weather, the approximately two-hour commencement ceremonies will be moved to Sunday, Dec. 15.

For those unable to attend, the ceremonies will stream live at video.utoledo.edu.

For more information, go to the UToledo commencement website.