Professor named president-elect of engineering society | UToledo News

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Professor named president-elect of engineering society

Lu

Lu

Dr. Jian-yu Lu, UT professor of bioengineering, has been elected president-elect of the Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control Society of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

The institute has more than 400,000 members internationally, making it both the largest engineering society and the largest scientific society in the world. Within the organization, there are nearly 40 societies based on discipline that are governed internally by elected and appointed committee members.

Lu was voted president-elect unanimously by Administrative Committee members of the Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control Society. He will serve as president-elect for 2012 and 2013, president from 2014 to 2015, junior past president from 2016 to 2017, and senior past president from 2018 to 2019.

“I feel this is an honor for UT because many members of the Administrative Committee and other committees of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control Society are from big-name universities. But for UT to become bigger and closer to those names, we need people at the University to promote our program,” said Lu, who has taught at the University since 1997 and served as the graduate director of the Department of Bioengineering from 1999 to 2002.

The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control Society sponsor three conferences each year as well as an international journal called Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control. Lu served as editor-in-chief of that publication for six years.

The institute is comprised of engineers across many disciplines, from aerospace, automation, communication and computer engineering to power and electrical engineering, as well as biomedical engineering. Lu, who researches ultrasound technology, is part of the physics-engineering interface, under which medical ultrasound and physical acoustics are classified.

“Among other things, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers sets industry standards for communications, computers and consumer electronics, including wireless communications, cell phones and televisions, to provide companies to intercommunicate across brands,” Lu said. “The organization also sponsors dozens of journals and annually organizes more than 1,000 conferences.”

Prior to his election, Lu was made an Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Fellow, which is a prestigious honor.

In the world, less than 0.1 percent of institute members are elected Fellows each year. The University of Toledo has two Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Fellows among its faculty in the College of Engineering. While other faculty who have held the fellowship received the award for research they did at other institutions, Lu received the honor while he is working at the UT College of Engineering.

“I think the fellowship shows the strength of our university in the scientific and engineering disciplines,” Lu said. “When the engineering program at a university gets ranked, the number of Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Fellows also is considered.”

His election to the Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control Society is not the first position Lu has held with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. He also has served as general chair of the 2008 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers International Ultrasonics Symposium in Beijing, with more than 1,000 attendees, and was the technical program committee chair of the 2001 institute’s International Ultrasonics Symposium.

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