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Celebrate International Education Week at UToledo

A photo contest, a rice cook-off and the always popular International Village are some of the highlights of the Center for International Studies and Programs’ celebration of International Education Week, Nov. 12-15, at The University of Toledo.

“We want everyone to check out the many fun and academic events we have planned this year for International Education Week,” Xinren Yu, assistant director of the Center for International Studies and Programs, said.

Chunyang Chen, left, and Zhe Wang smiled for Min Dong, who took their photo in front of the Chinese Student Scholar Association table at a previous International Village, which was part of International Education Week.

“There’s something for everyone — students, faculty and staff. Learn about the benefits of international education,” he added.

Events will include study abroad information sessions, Confucius Institute open house, French film screening, passport day and more.

For a complete list of International Education Week events, go to the Center for International Studies and Programs’ website.

International Education Week celebrates diversity of voices and the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide. This joint initiative of the U.S. Department of State and the U.S. Department of Education is part of their efforts to promote programs that prepare Americans for a global environment and attract future leaders from abroad to study, learn and exchange experiences in the United States.

UToledo Opera Workshop to Present Two One-Act Operas by Menotti

The UToledo Opera Workshop Ensemble will present two of Gian Carlo Menotti’s best-loved one-act operas in a performance titled “The Magic of Menotti” Friday through Sunday, Nov. 15-17.

The ensemble will perform “The Telephone” and “Amelia Goes to the Ball” in two different performance settings — a dinner show and a traditional theatre performance.

Ben (Samuel Spencer) discovers that a smartphone is his biggest rival for his love, Lucy (Ashley Roarke), in the UToledo Opera Workshop Ensemble production of Menotti’s “The Telephone.”

In “The Telephone,” a young man, ready to propose, finds it impossible to break through his love’s addiction to her phone. The UToledo Opera ensemble gives this classic comedy an update for the smartphone era.

UToledo music students Ashley Roarke, soprano, and Sam Spencer, baritone, will play Lucy and Ben.

The title says it all: “Amelia Goes to the Ball” and — spoiler alert — she goes! Nothing will stop this young socialite from attending the most anticipated ball of the season — not her husband, not her lover, nor their battle for her affections.

UToledo music students featured in the opera are Paige Chapman, soprano; Catharine Jordan, soprano; Seth Johnson, tenor; Justin Harris, bass baritone; Taylor Waldfogel, soprano; Kailyn Wilson, soprano; Katherine Kuhlman, mezzo-soprano; Danielle Demeo, soprano; Ashley Roark, soprano; Sam Spencer, baritone; Brandon Warren, tenor; and Tingzhi Wu, tenor.

Production crew members are Dr. Emily K. Oehrtman, visiting assistant professor of voice, producer and co-director; Wayne Anthony, adjunct professor of voice, pianist and co-director; Seth Johnson, graduate student, costume crew coordinator; and Justin Harris, graduate student, set and prop crew coordinator.

Dinner show performances will be held at the Carranor Hunt and Polo Club, 502 E. 2nd St. in Perrysburg, Friday, Nov. 15, at 6:30 p.m. and Sunday, Nov. 17, at 5 p.m. A dinner show ticket includes both operas and a meal of prime rib or chicken Marsala, as well as salad, dessert buffet, coffee, tea and water. A cash bar also will be available; however, no credit cards will be accepted at the bar. There is a 10% discount on two or more dinner show tickets. Use the promo code UT Opera when purchasing.

Tickets to the dinner shows are $50 general admission; $45 for all UToledo employees and alumni, seniors 60 and older, and members of the military; and $40 for students and children. Dinner show tickets are only available in advance. Purchase tickets by Wednesday, Nov. 13.

The traditional theatre performance will be held Saturday, Nov. 16, at 8 p.m. in the Center for Performing Arts Recital Hall. Tickets to the traditional performance are $15 general admission; $12 for all UToledo employees and alumni, seniors 60 and older, and members of the military; $10 for students and children; and free for UToledo students with ID. Tickets to this performance are available in advance or at the door.

Advance tickets to any of the performances are available through the UToledo Center for Performing Arts Box Office. Call 419.530.ARTS (2787) or go to the School of Visual and Performing Arts’ website.

Toledo to Host Northern Illinois Nov. 13 With Division Title Race on Line

It’s November, and in the world of college football, that means MACtion, and with MACtion comes the annual showdown between Toledo and Northern Illinois.

The Rockets and Huskies will meet in the Glass Bowl Wednesday, Nov. 13, at 8 p.m. The game will be broadcast on ESPN2.

The Rockets enter Wednesday’s home game vs. Northern Illinois a half-game out of first place in the MAC West Division.

In every single season since 2010, Toledo and NIU have met in November with the MAC West title still at stake for one or both schools. Despite the fact that both teams have multiple conference losses this season, this year’s matchup could be a factor in determining the West Division representative to the Mid-American Conference Championship Game Dec. 7.

Toledo (6-3, 3-2 MAC) is still in the thick of the division race. The Rockets are a half-game behind Western Michigan and Central Michigan (both 4-2) and tied with Ball State (3-2). Toledo and CMU meet in the season finale in Mount Pleasant Friday, Nov. 29.

For NIU (3-6, 2-3 MAC), on the other hand, a loss to the Rockets would officially knock them out of the race.

Toledo is coming off two consecutive home wins, most recently a 35-33 thriller over Kent State Nov. 5. Junior Shakif Seymour rushed for a career-high 175 yards and two touchdowns to lead the Rockets. Seymour, taking over as Toledo’s main running option due to a first-half injury to sophomore Bryant Koback, gained 40 yards and two first downs in Toledo’s final possession as the Rockets ran out the clock and held on to the victory.

Northern Illinois is coming off a 48-10 loss at Central Michigan Nov. 2. The Huskies rank third in the MAC in total defense, allowing an average 372.7 yards per game. The offense is led by senior quarterback Ross Bowers, who is second in the MAC with 243.4 yards passing per contest.

Toledo leads, 31-15. NIU beat the Rockets, 38-15, in DeKalb last year.

Full-time UToledo employees and retirees may purchase two tickets at half-price. Additional tickets may be purchased at the full price. UToledo students are admitted to home games free with ID.

To purchase tickets, stop by the UT Athletic Ticket Office, located in the Sullivan Athletic Complex at Savage Arena, go to the Toledo Football Ticket Central website, or call 419.530.GOLD (4653).

Promotions Set for Upcoming Toledo Men’s Basketball Season

The University of Toledo Athletic Department has announced its promotional schedule for the 2019-20 men’s basketball season. The Rockets will play 15 home games this season in Savage Arena, highlighted by contests vs. archrival Bowling Green and defending Mid-American Conference Champion Buffalo.

The home schedule will feature fan-friendly events including, theme nights, giveaways and special offers. For a complete listing of promotions, visit the men’s basketball website.

Toledo’s fourth annual Rockets for Life game will be held Saturday, Feb. 15.

After two road games, Toledo will host Robert Morris Saturday, Nov. 16, and Howard Sunday, Nov. 17, as part of the Men Against Breast Cancer Invitational in its first two home contests.

Listed by date, special events scheduled include:

Saturday, Nov. 23 vs. Northwestern Ohio — Performance by UToledo twirler Caroline Langfitt.

Saturday, Nov. 30 vs. Oakland — Thanks for Giving; bring canned goods, toiletries or gently-used clothing to game.

Sunday, Dec. 8 vs. Marshall — Santa Claus visit, Battery Wholesale teddy bear toss, and a bounce house in the Fetterman Gym.

Saturday, Jan. 11 vs. Western Michigan — MAC home opener and Scout Night and Sleepover.

Saturday, Jan. 25 vs. Bowling Green — #PackSavage.

Tuesday, Jan. 28 vs. Kent State — Military Appreciation Night.

Tuesday, Feb. 11 vs. Miami — Craft Beer Night.

Saturday, Feb. 15 vs. Buffalo — Rockets for Life Game; wear neon colors to support Life Connection of Ohio.

Saturday, Feb. 29 vs. Ball State — Throwback to 1990s.

Friday, March 6 vs. Eastern Michigan — Senior Night and Dancing Rockettes Performance.

Full-time UToledo employees and retirees may purchase two tickets at half-price. Additional tickets may be purchased at the full price. UToledo students are admitted to home games free with ID.

To purchase tickets, stop by the UToledo Athletic Ticket Office, located in the Sullivan Athletic Complex at Savage Arena, go to the Toledo men’s basketball ticket central website, or call 419.530.GOLD (4653).

Women’s Basketball Home Schedule to Feature Theme Nights, Giveaways

The University of Toledo Athletic Department has announced its promotional schedule for the 2019-20 women’s basketball campaign. The Rockets will play 14 home games in Savage Arena this year, highlighted by Dayton, Memphis and Belmont, as well as an ultra-competitive Mid-American Conference slate.

Toledo’s home opener is against Dayton Saturday, Nov. 9, at 2 p.m.

The Rockets will play 14 games in Savage Arena this season, highlighted by matchups against Dayton, Memphis, Bowling Green and 2019 Mid-American Conference Champion Buffalo.

The home schedule will feature fan-friendly events, including theme nights, giveaways and special offers. For a complete listing of promotions, visit the women’s basketball website.

Listed by date, special events scheduled include:

Sunday, Nov. 24 vs. Memphis — Igniter Day; celebrate the 20th year of the fan club.

Wednesday, Nov. 27 vs. Valparaiso — Thanks for Giving; bring canned goods, toiletries or gently used clothing.

Tuesday, Dec. 3 vs. Belmont — Education Day; local schools come to Savage Arena for a day of fun, learning and Rocket basketball.

Wednesday, Jan. 8 vs. Buffalo — Mid-American Conference opener; Toledo Cheerleading performance.

Wednesday, Jan. 29 vs. Eastern Michigan — Wine Night and 1970s night.

Saturday, Feb. 1 vs. Kent State — National Girls & Women in Sport Day and Cheer Clinic.

Wednesday, Feb. 12 vs. Ball State — Military Appreciation Night.

Saturday, Feb. 22 vs. Western Michigan — Rockets for the Cure.

Saturday, March 7 vs. Northern Illinois — Senior Day and Dancing Rockettes Performance.

Full-time UToledo employees and retirees may purchase two tickets at half-price. Additional tickets may be purchased at the full price. UToledo students are admitted to home games free with ID.

To purchase tickets, stop by the UToledo Athletic Ticket Office, located in the Sullivan Athletic Complex at Savage Arena, go to the Toledo women’s basketball ticket central website, or call 419.530.GOLD (4653).

UToledo to Honor Veterans Nov. 11

The 15th annual Veterans Appreciation Breakfast and Resource Fair will take place Monday, Nov. 11, at 8 a.m. in Savage Arena at The University of Toledo.

UToledo teams up with the American Red Cross and the Lucas County Veterans Service Commission to pay tribute to area veterans and active service members for the sacrifices they have made for their country.

Dr. Mike Toole, dean of the UToledo College of Engineering, will speak at the event on behalf of the University.

“It is an honor and a privilege to be able to thank the men and women who have served and are serving the United States in the armed forces,” Toole said. “This event is a way for our community members to come together to express gratitude and show respect to these dedicated individuals.”

Wishard

First Sgt. Nathan Wishard of the U.S. Army will give the keynote address.

A native of York, Penn., Wishard enlisted in the Army in 2003. He attended basic training at Fort Jackson, S.C., and completed advanced individual training in the military occupational specialty of Apache helicopter armament/electrical/avionic systems repair at Fort Eustis, Va.

Wishard’s deployments include Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, where he served with the 82nd Combat Aviation Brigade, Attach Reconnaissance Battalion, Wolfpack. Currently, he is serving in the Toledo Recruiting Company within the Cleveland Battalion.

His awards and decorations include a Meritorious Service Medal 2nd Oak Leaf Cluster, Army Commendation Medal 5th Oak Leaf Cluster, Army Achievement Medal 17th Oak Leaf Cluster, Military Outstanding Volunteer Service Medal and Good Conduct Medal 3rd Knot.

In addition to the free breakfast, local veterans and members of the military and their families will have access to more than 30 military-friendly community resources.

The program also will feature entertainment by the UToledo Jazz Ensemble and fourth-graders from Waterville Primary School, as well as a historical military vehicle display.

Members of the Rossford High School S.O.S. (Serving Our Soldiers) Club will greet and assist veterans through the breakfast line.

Free parking will be available in lots 3, 5 and 6 near Savage Arena.

For more information on the event, contact the UToledo Office of Special Events at 419.530.2200 or specialevents@utoledo.edu.

Welcome to ‘The Jungle’: Department of Theatre and Film to Stage Adaptation of Novel

The University of Toledo Department of Theatre and Film will present “The Jungle,” an award-winning adaptation of Upton Sinclair’s novel, written and directed by Matt Foss, UToledo assistant professor of theatre.

Performances will take place Friday through Sunday, Nov. 8-10 and 15-17, in the Center for Performing Arts Center Theatre. Curtain time is 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday; Sunday shows are at 2 p.m.

Sinclair’s landmark novel, written in 1906, exposed the appalling working conditions of immigrants employed in Chicago’s meat-packing industry. Originally written to shed light on issues surrounding workers, immigrants and the growing income disparity in America, Sinclair commented that he aimed for the public’s heart, but ultimately only “hit it in the stomach.”

The book prompted transformative changes throughout the industry and led to the development of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, but had little to no effect on immigration, poverty or workers’ rights.

The production features a large cast who stream over a three-story set, using printmaking techniques to create a turn-of-the-century packinghouse. Extensive choreography created by Abby Glanville, academic advisor in the College of Arts and Letters — along with design and technical work by Drew Parmelee, senior film/video major, associate sound designer; Kelly McBane, lecturer of theatre, costume shop manager; Stephen Sakowski, assistant professor of theatre, lighting and sound designer; Daniel Thobias, associate professor of theatre, production designer; and Nathaniel White, assistant lecturer of theatre, technical director and scene shop manager — create a dynamic, 90-minute telling of this classic novel.

Foss adapted and directed Upton Sinclair’s “The Jungle” for Oracle Productions in Chicago in 2014. That production received Chicago Jeff Award Nominations for outstanding production, director, ensemble, and won for best new adaptation.

The cast features Jordyn Beery, sophomore theatre major; Maggie Carder, freshman media communications major; Erin Coyne, sophomore theatre major; Emily Damschroder, sophomore theatre major; Jeffery Enck, freshman theatre design and technology major; Dona Gamblin, freshman theatre major; Sarena Jackson, 2019 UToledo theatre alumna; Shaquira Jackson, senior theatre major; Maya Kinney, freshman theatre major; Andrew R. Kleopfer, senior theatre major; Ben Kunec, sophomore theatre and communication double major; Becca Lustic, senior theatre major; Olivia Manias, junior creative writing major; Grace E. Mulinix, Toledo Early College High School senior and UToledo theatre major; Faith E. Murphy, senior theatre major; Alexandria Rayford-West, junior creative writing and theatre double major; Victoria Rinker, senior theatre major; Ezekiel Roberts, Toledo Early College High School junior and UToledo theatre major; Dillon Sickels, sophomore theatre major; Alec Simon. sophomore theatre major; Eve Smith, sophomore theatre major; Charlotte Vaughn, theatre major; and Kyle Yerg, senior philosophy and literature double major.

Members of the design team are Holly Monsos, interim chair of the Department of Theatre and Film, producer; Katelyn Justice, sophomore theatre major, paint charge; Matthew Kerr, electrical engineering major, assistant lighting designer; Addison Toth, sophomore theatre major, stage manager; Jared Kaplan, freshman political science major, and Elise Pahl, junior, theatre design and technology major, assistant stage managers; Christopher M. Montpetit, lecturer of theatre, theatre/production manager; and Imani Hudson, junior theatre major, house manager.

Tickets are $10 for students; $12 for UToledo faculty, staff and alumni, and military members and seniors; and $18 for the general public. Call 419.530.ARTS (2787) or go to the School of Visual and Performing Arts’ website. Tickets also will be available at the door.

Toledo Beats Kent State, 35-33

Junior Shakif Seymour rushed for a career-high 175 yards and two touchdowns to lead Toledo to a hard-fought 35-33 triumph over Kent State Tuesday night in the Glass Bowl.

Seymour, taking over as the Rockets’ main running option due to a first-half injury to sophomore Bryant Koback, gained 40 yards and two first downs in Toledo’s final possession as the Rockets ran out the clock and held on to the victory.

Shakif Seymour ran for 175 yards and two touchdowns in Toledo’s 35-33 win over Kent State.

With the win, Toledo (6-3, 3-2 Mid-American Conference) gained bowl eligibility, but, more importantly, stayed in the hunt in the MAC West Division. The Rockets are a half-game behind Western Michigan and Central Michigan (4-2) and tied with Ball State (3-2).

“Conference wins are tough to get in November,” said Head Coach Jason Candle. “Everybody wants to be playing meaningful games in November and that’s where we’re at. We played a much-improved team tonight and it was a gritty performance from our guys. I’m really proud of their effort.

The Rocket defense made it difficult for Kent State quarterback Dustin Crum.

“We have a very young football team, and it can be really hard to predict what’s going to happen. I trust the leadership and makeup of our players, we recruit guys who are winners. Pride is a tough thing, it can be a slippery slope. It can bite you or it can propel you to some great things. Our guys have responded the last couple weeks, and they’ve gotten a couple tough wins.”

Toledo held a 28-17 advantage at halftime, but saw the lead go down to one, 28-27, when the Golden Flashes scored late in the third quarter.

Seymour scored his second touchdown of the game to put Toledo up, 35-27, with 11:49 left. But Kent State responded with a 15-play, 70-yard drive that culminated with a five-yard TD pass from QB Dustin Crum to Keenan Orr on fourth down. Trailing by two, 35-33, the Flashes went for two, and Crum came up inches short on the rushing attempt.

Toledo never let KSU have another chance to score by controlling the ball for the remainder of the game.

Toledo’s offense racked up 483 yards of total offense, including 289 yards on the ground. Junior Eli Peters led the passing game, completing 15 of 25 passes for 194 yards and one score.

The defense was led by senior linebacker Jordan Fisher (11 tackles, 1.5 tackles for loss) and sophomore defensive end Jamal Hines (six tackles, 2.5 tackles for loss).

Up next, the Rockets host Northern Illinois on Senior Night Wednesday, Nov. 13, in the Glass Bowl.

UTMC to Host Educational Program on CryoMAZE, Other Treatments for Atrial Fibrillation

The University of Toledo Medical Center now offers an innovative, minimally invasive surgical treatment for patients with atrial fibrillation, eliminating the need to continue on blood thinners.

The procedure, called CryoMAZE, uses precision application of extreme cold inside the heart, establishing a barrier that prevents stray electrical signals from causing the heart to beat irregularly.

“The goal of this procedure is to kill the cells without damaging the walls of the heart. This is why this procedure does not accidentally make a hole in the heart which can happen with heat-based procedures. If the cells are dead, they cannot conduct electricity. That makes a fence so the electrical impulses don’t spill over into the rest of atrium. It’s like putting insulation on a wire — you are letting electrical impulse to go through only in the normal path without spreading around randomly,” said Dr. Saqib Masroor, chief of the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery at UTMC.

Masroor will give a free, educational presentation on atrial fibrillation and the latest treatment options, including minimally invasive CryoMAZE, Thursday, Nov. 7, at 6:30 p.m. in the Center for Creative Education on Health Science Campus.

For more information or to register for the event, call 419.383.6939.

Atrial fibrillation, or AFib, is the most common type of heart arrhythmia in the United States; it affects between 2.7 million and 6.1 million Americans.

In AFib, the heart’s upper chambers, or atria, don’t beat in coordination with the heart’s lower chambers or ventricles. That can lead to pooling of the blood and clotting in the atria, creating an increased risk of congestive heart failure and stroke.

Blood thinners are commonly used to reduce the risk of stroke in AFib patients, but they can increase the risk of bleeding. Other options for treating AFib require open-heart surgery or the use of catheters threaded through major arteries in either the groin or neck to get to the heart.

In the minimally invasive CryoMAZE procedure, a surgeon makes a small incision in the right side of the chest. Through that, they’re able to access the outside of the heart and create scar tissue with the specialized probe that is cooled to approximately -60 degrees Celsius. A surgeon also can put a clip on the left atrial through the same incision.

The recovery time in the hospital is typically three to five days.

Masroor said success rates for CryoMAZE are approximately 90%. An added benefit of using cold rather than heat to create scar tissue is that there isn’t a risk of putting a hole in the heart.

“Many people don’t know their options beyond blood thinners,” Masroor said. “We want to educate people that there are many safe options that will prevent them from having to take blood thinners and have complications from atrial fibrillation.”

Lake Erie Bill of Rights Topic of Great Lakes Water Conference Nov. 8 at UToledo

Toledo’s innovative Lake Erie Bill of Rights will take center stage with a family of “forever chemicals” during the 19th annual Great Lakes Water Conference at The University of Toledo College of Law.

Approved by voters in February and challenged by a lawsuit in federal court, the new “rights of nature” ordinance that allows citizens to sue on behalf of the lake to address pollution has attracted national and international attention.

The UToledo Lake Erie Center research vessel helps to monitor the lake’s water quality.

The conference, which is sponsored by the College of Law and its Legal Institute of the Great Lakes, will take place Friday, Nov. 8, from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Law Center McQuade Auditorium.

“Three panels of experts will be tackling issues of local, regional, national and international import,” said Ken Kilbert, UToledo professor of law and director of the Legal Institute of the Great Lakes. “Law and policy are key to the solutions.”

The keynote speaker will be Carrie Sowden, archaeological director of the National Museum of the Great Lakes. She will talk at 8:45 a.m.

The first panel, which will debate the city of Toledo’s Lake Erie Bill of Rights, will start at 9:15 a.m. Kilbert will serve as moderator with speakers Jason Hill, court administrator for the Ohio Sixth District Court of Appeals, who teaches election law; Terry Lodge, a Toledo attorney who specializes in environmental and energy issues and supports the ordinance; and Louis Tosi, attorney with Shumaker, Loop & Kendrick in Toledo, who serves as chair of the firm’s Environmental Practice Group.

The other two panels will explore water quality problems posed by PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances) chemicals, a proposed rule affecting the reach of the federal Clean Water Act, Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine’s the new H2Ohio initiative, and a proposed new diversion of Great Lakes water.

The one-day conference is free and open to the public. Registration is $75 for attorneys seeking 4.5 hours of Ohio Continuing Legal Education credit.

For more information about the conference and to register for credit or box lunch, visit the College of Law website.